Peru: Machu Picchu and the Manu Road Trip Report, July 2017

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JULY/AUGUST 2017

By Eduardo Ormaeche

Without doubt, our 2017 Peru Cusco and Manu birding trip was a great experience for those who never have been in the Neotropics, especially considering the short time to explore as much as we could in 10 days only. We decided to focus on the highlights of the south-eastern part of the country, such as the legendary ruins of Machu Picchu and the humid mountain forest of the Manu Road. We had time to spend a full day along the coast south of Lima, adding some coastal birds, and another day to visit the dry mountains of Cusco and the famous Sacred Valley during our journey to Machu Picchu. On this 10-day birding trip we were very lucky with both weather and bird activity. Focusing only on Manu without including the Amazon lowlands allowed us to record 403 avian species, including several country and regional endemics.

Our trip began in the city of Lima, which is the main entrance point to the country for all international travelers. The group stayed in the convenient Miraflores area out of the bustling urban horrors of the airport area. The next morning we met at the hotel, and before jumping into the vehicle we had a little time to enjoy West Peruvian Dove, Long-tailed Mockingbird, Rufous-collared Sparrow, Southern Beardless Tyrannulet, Amazilia Hummingbird, and Scrub Blackbird just in front of the hotel gardens.

We left the city and took the Pan-American Highway directly to the fishing village of Pucusana. On the way to the highway we crossed the famous Pantanos de Villa (Villa Marshes) Wildlife Refuge, which is a classic birding site near the city, but we decided to leave it for later in the day and arrive at Pucusana as early as possible.

Once at the Pucusana lookout we saw our first Belcher’s Gull, dozens of Inca Terns flying in front of us, Peruvian Pelican, Peruvian Booby, Blackish Oystercatcher, and Red-legged Cormorant. We scanned the waters in search of the most-wanted Humboldt Penguin and had the privilege of watching through the scope a family of eight porpoising in the water.

We then visited the opposite site of the lookout to admire Inca Terns roosting at an incredibly close distance, about four to six meters in front of our eyes. It was fantastic watching these gorgeous terns at such proximity and with excellent light as well, indeed a treat for photographers.

Later we took a boat to sail around Pucusana Island. This is a short and gentle boat ride in the bay of Pucusana, which allowed us close-up views of species like Guanay Cormorant, Blackish Oystercatcher, Peruvian Pelican, Peruvian Booby, Whimbrel, Ruddy Turnstone, and a colony of Blue-footed Booby as a main target of the site. It was nice to have two species of boobies roosting on the same cliff for comparison.

A great bonus was seeing the elusive and seldom-seen marine otter a short distance from our boat. This is normally a very shy species, but the number of sightings has been increasing since our last visit to this place. We also were able to watch a number of South American sea lions resting on the rocks while we were looking for the endemic Peruvian Seaside Cinclodes but we could not find it.

Then we hit the road again and drove 11 kilometers south of the Pan-American-Pucusana road junction to get to the Puerto Viejo Wetlands. Sadly, this area is not well protected, and the impact of human disturbance is very obvious. Nevertheless, the area always produces some nice surprises for birders; Peruvian Martin, Hudsonian and Marbled Godwits, and Wandering Tattler have been reported from the area. We arrived and quickly ticked our first target, the endemic Coastal Miner. Other birds included Grassland Yellow Finch, Peruvian Meadowlark, Chestnut-throated Seedeater, West Peruvian Dove, Black-crowned Night Heron, Great Egret, Striated Heron, Great Grebe, Wren-like Rushbird, and the gorgeous Many-colored Rush Tyrant.

After moving to the shore we saw hundreds of Grey Gulls and a few Whimbrels and American Oystercatchers. Normally this beach is empty during our winter and is only visited by surfers due to its spectaculars waves, but no services are available. So after our delicious picnic lunch we left Puerto Viejo and moved back to Lima, but with a short stop along the Pan-American Highway near the archaeological site of Pachacamac. Even though the archaeological site is not obvious from the road there is a small bridge next to the road, where you can carefully park and look for some species. Here we observed Croaking Ground Dove, Groove-billed Ani, Amazilia Hummingbird, Chestnut-throated Seedeater, Pacific Parrotlet, and Northern Crested Caracara.

We continued our drive towards Pantanos de Villa, where we managed to add Andean Coot, Common Gallinule, Pied-billed Grebe, Little Blue Heron, Snowy Egret, Black-necked Stilt, Cinnamon Teal, White-cheeked Pintail, Grey-headed Gull, Laughing Gull, a shy Least Bittern, a single Burrowing Owl, and a nice flock of Black Skimmers to our list.

The day had been nice so far, but we were still missing an endemic target and did not surrender. On the way back to Miraflores we took a detour to the Circuito de Playas (which is the road that runs parallel to the shore of Lima and connects Chorrillos and La Punta in the Callao province). This road is very popular and busy during most of the day but presents really nice scenery. We went straight to the Chorrillos shore, and on the rocky slopes, as if it were meant for us, we found our last target for the day, Peruvian Seaside Cinclodes, waiting for us. Finally we arrived back at the hotel to get ready for the next day’s flight to Cusco.

After a smooth one-hour flight we arrived in Cusco and were immediately transferred to the Huacarpay wetlands, which are located not far from Cusco. We stopped our vehicle at the local restaurant and immediately started to find species of bush and scrub habitat, such as Blue-and-yellow Tanager, Golden-billed Saltator, Band-tailed Seedeater, Chiguanco Thrush, Rufous-collared Sparrow, White-browed Chat-Tyrant, and the elusive Streak-fronted Thornbird

Then we explored on foot the rocky slopes near the Pikillaqta ruins, having splendid views of the endemic Rusty-fronted Canastero and Andean Flicker and great views of Black-chested Buzzard-Eagle and Variable Hawk.

A little bit lower, near the wetlands, we had great open views and could scan the area. Here we found Cinereous Harrier, Yellow-winged Blackbird, a very cooperative Plumbeous Rail, Andean Duck, Yellow-billed Teal, Yellow-billed Pintail, and Puna Teal. We also recorded another Many-colored Rush Tyrant, and Wren-like Rushbirds could be heard calling. Several Andean Lapwings, Andean Gulls, and Puna Ibis were also enjoyed.

Having enjoyed great views of all the morning’s target species we moved along the Urubamba River, also known as the Sacred Valley of the Incas, and almost two hours later we arrived in Ollantaytambo at the comfortable Hotel Pakaritampu. The drive to Ollantaytambo was not very birdy, but we still added Sparkling Violetear and our first Spot-winged Pigeon en route. Once in the hotel we ordered some drinks in the garden and started looking for the star of the day, the endemic Bearded Mountaineer. Soon we managed to have terrific views of this cracker species feeding easily in the hotel garden, where it seems to be resident.

Other birds we observed in the garden were Black-throated Flowerpiercer, Rusty Flowerpiercer, a perched Spot-winged Pigeon, Hooded Siskin, Cinereous Conebill, and an awesome glimpse of Giant Hummingbird. This had been our first day in the Cusco Region, and after this exciting, long day we went to get a hot meal to recover our energy.

The next day was incredibly hectic. New regulations for visitors to Machu Picchu include a single admission fee valid for six hours only and two groups per day. The first group is allowed to visit from 06.00 a.m. to 12.00 p.m.; the second group is allowed to visit from 12.00 p.m. to 17.00 p.m. In addition to a the lack of prior information and the disorder produced by these new regulations, they force the tourists to get bus tickets (for the bus that goes from Aguas Calientes to the ruins) well in advance, resulting in long queues even early in the morning. I do not know how, but we survived all this chaos and sometime later than expected we were visiting Machu Picchu as part of the first group, and we fortunately had cracker views of our major endemic target, Inca Wren. However, getting to and visiting Machu Picchu is not as much fun anymore as it used to be. The ruins themselves did not offer much more than the expected Blue-and-white Swallow, Tropical Kingbird, Rufous-collared Sparrow, and White-winged Black Tyrant.

We arrived back in Aguas Calientes for a quick lunch and then spent the rest of the afternoon birding along the Urubamba River between the train station and the old helicopter field. We managed to get first scope views of a pair of Torrent Ducks (we had seen several pairs from the train window on the trip from Ollantaytambo to Aguas Calientes) in addition to Torrent Tyrannulet, White-capped Dipper, Andean Guan, Plum-crowned Parrot, Azara’s Spinetail, Andean Motmot, Saffron-crowned Tanager, and Yellow-bellied Seedeater.

We spent the whole next morning birding the area between Puente Ruinas and the Mandor Valley, a walk that starts just in the village and following the river towards the old train station. The forested area just behind the first bridge provided Saffron-crowned Tanager, Black Phoebe, and Band-winged Nightjar before dawn.

The campsite at Los Jardines de Mandor and the new Butterfly House are always good for Ocellated Piculet, Mitred Parakeet, Slate-throated Whitestart, Streaked Xenops, Chestnut-capped Brushfinch and Grey-breasted Wood Wren. The people involved in the butterfly farm project are maintaining fruit feeder for tanagers, and during our visit we saw Blue-grey Tanager, Saffron-crowned Tanager, Thick-billed Euphonia, and Dusky-green Oropendola. One should keep an eye out here for a potential Versicolored Barbet, which is usually seen a little bit further at the old train station. It is also appropriate to support the project with a volunteer contribution to help them buying fruit for the birds and encourage their offering of more facilities for birders.

At Puente Ruinas we found Golden-crowned Flycatcher, Mottle-cheeked and Sclater’s Tyrannulets, Golden-naped Tanager, Barred Becard, Slaty Tanager, Capped Conebill, Golden-olive Woodpecker, Silver-backed Tanager, Variable Antshrike, Pale-legged Warbler, and Tropical Parula. We continued walking further with more views of Andean Motmot and Roadside Hawk. Suddenly the call of White-eared Solitaire revealed its presence, and after a tape attempt we managed to bring it closer and were able to admire its striking appearance – for sure one of the most handsome birds of the tropical Andean cloudforest. A small flock with the usual friends also provided the uncommon Fawn-breasted Tanager and Oleaginous Hemispingus as new for the trip. We walked back to Puente Ruinas, and I was lucky enough to hear the call of Masked Fruiteater and to show both male and female very well to all participants. We walked back to town for lunch, retrieved our luggage from the hotel, and walked to the station to get our train back to Ollantaytambo, from where we traveled by car to Cusco for a comfortable overnight.

The next day we started our trip to the Manu Road. We were planning to spend a night at the Wayquecha Cloud Forest Biological Station and then three nights at the Cock of the Rock Lodge (CORL) in Manu National Park and in this short time to try to enjoy as much as possible. This is one of the most incredible birding route in the Andes with different in altitudinal ranges, diverse natural habitats changing from high puna grasslands to elfin and cloudforest mountains, and upper tropical Amazon habitats in an elevation that goes from 3600 to 500 meters. The secret is always the weather, and we could not complain at all, as we indeed had good weather overall, and the misty and raining day we had at CORL allowed us to have a very active flock activity throughout the afternoon.

We left Cusco and again passed the Huacarpay wetlands, and then we crossed the Puente Huambutio on the way to Paucartambo, the closest town to the entrance of Manu National Park. On the way we added several new species to our trip list, including Plumbeous, Peruvian, and Ash-breasted Sierra Finch, Cream-winged Cinclodes, Ochre-naped Ground Tyrant, Slender-billed Miner, Mountain Caracara, Rufous-webbed Bush Tyrant, Andean Flicker, Spot-winged Pigeon, Chiguanco Thrush, and Shining Sunbeam, in habitats such as open agricultural pastures, rocky slopes, and short, bushy vegetation with Eucalyptus trees.

Paucartambo is a picturesque, remote Andean town in the mountains above Cusco and is famous for being the center of the religious festival of Virgen Del Carmen and the entrance of the Manu Biosphere Reserve. We stopped in the market to stretch the legs and crossed the pedestrian bridge over the Quencomayo River, looking for Brown-bellied Swallow and also finding White-winged Cinclodes and White-bellied Hummingbird.

Not much later we reached the Acjanaco pass, the gateway to Manu National Park. While our staff set up our picnic lunch we were busy with surprisingly good flock activity for such a bad time of the day; we easily encountered the endemic Creamy-crested Spinetail, White-throated Tyrannulet, White-banded Tyrannulet, Moustached Flowerpiercer, Brown-backed Chat-Tyrant, and Violet-throated Starfrontlet. After lunch we explored the area, and it was well worth it. We enjoyed Grass Wren, Puna Thistletail, Blue-blacked Conebill, Puna Tapaculo, Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager, and the localized Scribble-tailed Canastero.

After getting back to the main road we drove toward the Wayquecha Cloud Forest Biological Station, amazed at the change of scenery and habitats, and added more species to our list, including Red-crested Cotinga, Streak-throated Bush Tyrant, and Andean Guan. We arrived at the station in perfect time for a nice cup of tea and admired a number of new hummingbird feeders with species such as Long-tailed Sylph, Amethyst-throated Sunangel, and Tyrian Metaltail. We also found Masked Flowerpiercer to be rather common around the lodge clearing as well as Rufous-breasted Chat-Tyrant.

The next morning we left the station before dawn in the direction of the tunnels, and we scored with an amazing view of a male Swallow-tailed Nightjar sitting by the road. An incredible start! At the tunnels we added Grass-green Tanager, Superciliaried Hemispingus, Citrine Warbler, the endemic Marcapata Spinetail, Pearled Treerunner, and Montane Woodcreeper. While walking back to the station we had good views of Andean Solitaire, Masked Trogon, Barred Fruiteater, and a cooperative Trilling Tapaculo – all these goodies before breakfast!

After a quick and yummy breakfast we started birding the road again, focusing on the area between the station and Pillahuata. We did well, adding Bolivian Tyrannulet, Black-backed Tody-Flycatcher, Three-striped Hemispingus, Golden-collared Tanager, Blue-and-black Tanager, and Maroon-belted Chat-Tyrant to our list. A remarkable Sword-billed Hummingbird proved to us that birding in the tropical Andes is magic. Then we found a number of flocks with Grey-eared Brushfinch, Fulvous Wren, Mountain Wren, Andean Guan, Sierran Elaenia, Hooded Mountain Tanager, Southern Mountain Cacique, and a diurnal Yungas Pygmy-Owl. We also heard Red-and-white Antpitta quite often during the morning, but by the time we arrived in Pillahuata it did not respond; however, we had a plan B for it. We started to descend deeper in to the lush forest of Manu below Pillahuata, where we found White-collared Jay, Chestnut-bellied Mountain Tanager, Blue-capped Tanager, Chestnut-breasted Coronet, and Golden-headed Quetzal. Later in the day the birding became quieter, though, and we didn’t manage much more than Black-backed Grosbeak, Streak-necked Flycatcher, Cinnamon Flycatcher, and Ochre-faced Tody-Flycatcher at its classic stakeout.

We were in time to look for the Andean Cock-of-the-rock courtship display at the famous lek along the Manu Road. Normally almost all birders who stayed at CORL in the past used to visit the former Andean Cock-of-the-rock lek. However, this lek has no longer been active for several years since the place was by hit by a landslide, which washed it off the slope. As a consequence the birds are now displaying at another lek that is run by a different lodge. Even though this lodge is not been suitable for most birders, the current lek is quite conveniently near the road. We had a very active afternoon with several male Andean Cocks-of-the-rock present and luckily also one or two females. It was a great time indeed with nice views of Peru’s national bird.

Other species we saw this afternoon included Bolivian White-crowned Tapaculo, Two-banded Warbler, Three-striped Warbler, and Grey-breasted Wood Wren.

We arrived back at CORL in time to enjoy all expected species of hummingbirds at the feeders, including Fork-tailed Woodnymph, Many-spotted Hummingbird, Green Hermit, Violet-fronted Brilliant, White-bellied Woodstar, Wire-crested Thorntail, Rufous-booted Racket-tail, Sparkling Violetear, and Lesser Violetear.

The next morning was spent around the lodge vicinity and on the road for a few kilometers. The activity at the lodge was good in the morning with a great selection of classic tropical species such as Golden Tanager, Blue-grey Tanager, Silver-beaked Tanager, Dusky-green Oropendola, Buff-throated Saltator, and Orange-bellied Euphonia attending the fruit feeder. Around the garden we observed Plumbeous Pigeon, a single male Andean Cock-of-the-rock, and Paradise, Blue-necked, Spotted, Bay-headed, and Palm Tanagers while enjoying a cup of tea on the lodge veranda. Suddenly we were surprised and shocked by the seldom-seen Brown Tinamou walking across the garden. This is the third time that we managed to have this experience at the same place.

This made us wonder how many other species the lodge could attract for easier observation if they would invest resources in creating more attractions for birders, such as building a strategically located compost area with a hide for observers or even start feeding tinamous and antpittas as they do in other parts of the Andes in northern Peru.

Outside the lodge we encountered Tropical Kingbird, Lemon-browed Flycatcher, Streaked Flycatcher, Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant, Common and Yellow-throated Bush Tanagers, Blue-naped Chlorophonia, Golden-olive Woodpecker, Montane Foliage-gleaner, Yellow-breasted Warbling Antbird, White-backed Fire-eye, Stripe-chested Antwren, Chestnut-backed Antshrike, Slaty-capped Flycatcher, Olive-backed Woodcreeper, Slaty Antwren, Magpie Tanager, Paradise Tanager, Squirrel Cuckoo, Long-tailed Tyrant, and Crested and Russet-backed Oropendolas.

Back at the lodge in the garden we only found White-tipped Dove. However, a single Central American agouti, a Bolivian squirrel, and tayra (a mustelid related to weasels) were good additions to our mammal list.

After a welcome cup of tea we left the lodge again, driving up the road this time. We were thrilled to find the mysterious Andean Potoo, and other birds in the vicinity included the striking Versicolored Barbet, Marble-faced Bristle Tyrant, Bolivian Tyrannulet, and Black-eared Hemispingus. At dusk we had great views of a male Lyre-tailed Nightjar, and back at the lodge we enjoyed superb views of Rufescent Screech Owl before the end of the day.

The following day we left CORL toward lower elevations with the plan to bird the recently opened Villa Carmen Biological Station. This place is run by ACCA (Asociación para la Conservación de la Cuenca Amazónica), the same association that runs the Wayquecha and Los Amigos biological stations. Villa Carmen is located at Pilcopata on the lower parts of the Manu Road, and we expected to arrive there by 10 a.m., leaving CORL by 6 a.m. En route we saw Yellow-breasted Antwren, Black-billed Treehunter, Chestnut-bellied Seed Finch, Fiery-capped Manakin, and the elusive Peruvian Piedtail, a country endemic that showed nicely for the report photo cover. We managed to get good views of Ornate Antwren, Dot-winged Antwren, Blue Dacnis, Black-faced Dacnis, White-winged Tanager, and Bluish-fronted Jacamar. We passed the large bamboo stands of Chontachaka, where we tried for the endemic Black-backed Tody-Flycatcher sadly in vain. As soon we arrived in Patria, a small community in the lower valley, we found some common lowlands species such as Swallow Tanager, Rusty-fronted Tody-Flycatcher, Ruddy Ground Dove, Chestnut-bellied Seedeater, Blue-black Grassquit, and a few others. We arrived in Pilcopata, a larger village before the town of Atalaya and took a detour to the Villa Carmen Biological Station, where we spent the rest of the day. We saw good open-habitat birds around the station clearing, such as Swallow-tailed Kite, Grey-crowned Flatbill, and Purplish Jay, and at the main marsh we had nice views of Hoatzin and Limpkin.

The forested area in front of the bungalows was very good for the sometimes scarce Orange-fronted Plushcrown and the endemic Fine-barred Piculet. Although it was the quiet time of the day we explored the bamboo trail and managed to find Black-backed Tody-Flycatcher, Fiery-capped Manakin, White-lined Antbird, Flammulated Bamboo Tyrant, Bamboo Foliage-gleaner, and Manu Antbird.

After lunch we went to the main Pilcopata bridge to scan the Alto Madre de Dios River. Here we found a few Black Caracaras, White-winged Swallow, White-banded Swallow, a juvenile Fasciated Tiger Heron, and two Sunbitterns, which were a nice surprise for some of the participants. On the way to the Atalaya lookout we enjoyed views of a roosting Great Potoo, and at the lookout itself we observed Scarlet Macaws, a flock of Chestnut-fronted Macaws, and a pair of Blue-and-yellow Macaws. After a great time at lower elevations we returned to CORL for an overnight.

The plan for our last morning was to leave the lodge as early as possible and head straight to Pillahuata in order to try for Red-and-white Antpitta at a time when they are more active. Actually, our plan worked well; a few minutes after we arrived at Pillahuata we had a cracking view of the endemic Red-and-white Antpitta. With this target in the bag we searched for Grey-breasted Mountain Toucan, which we were lucky enough to find feeding by the road below the Wayquecha Cloud Forest Biological Station. Before we left Manu we explored the Canopy Walk trail, adding good views of Band-tailed Fruiteater, Black-throated Tody-Tyrant, Streaked Tuftedcheek, and Grass-green Tanager.

After a few days on the Manu Road we returned to Cusco to celebrate our great birding adventure and another successful Birding Ecotours 2017 southeast Peru tour.

 

SYSTEMATIC BIRD LIST

Tinamidae

Brown Tinamou Crypturellus obsoletus Great views of one individual in the gardens of Cock of the Rock Lodge

Anatidae

Torrent Duck Merganetta armata Several pairs seen along the Urubamba River during our train ride to Aguas Calientes. A pair was photographed nicely near Puente Ruinas.

Puna Teal Spatula puna Seen at Huacarpay Lake

Cinnamon Teal Spatula cyanoptera Seen at Villa Marshes and Huacarpay Lake

Yellow-billed Teal Anas flavirostris Seen at Huacarpay Lake

Yellow-billed Pintail Anas georgica Seen at Huacarpay Lake

White-cheeked Pintail Anas bahamensis Seen at Villa Marshes

Andean Duck Oxyura ferruginea Seen at Villa Marshes and Huacarpay Lake

Cracidae

Speckled Chachalaca Ortalis guttata Common around Villa Carmen Biological Station and CORL

Andean Guan Penelope montagnii Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Blue-throated Piping-Guan Pipile cumanensis One seen briefly at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Wattled Guan (H) Aburria aburri Heard below CORL. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Spheniscidae

Humboldt Penguin Spheniscus humboldti Great views of at least four individuals from the stakeout at Pucusana. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Podicipedidae

Great Grebe Podiceps major Seen in the quiet waters of Puerto Viejo and Villa Marshes

Pied-billed Grebe Podilymbus podiceps Seen at Villa Marshes

White-tufted Grebe Rollandia rolland Seen at Villa Marshes

Threskiornithidae

Puna Ibis Plegadis ridgwayi Seen at Villa Marshes and Huacarpay Lake

Andean Ibis Theristicus branickii Two were seen on the way to Paucartambo. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Ardeidae

Fasciated Tiger Heron Tigrisoma fasciatum Two seen at Alto Madre de Dios River from the Pilcopata bridge

Least Bittern Ixobrychus exilis Brief views at Pantanos de Villa

Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax Seen in the reeds of Puerto Viejo marshes

Yellow-crowned Night Heron Nyctanassa violacea Scope views at Pantanos de Villa

Striated Heron Butorides striata Seen at Puerto Viejo marshes

Western Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis Several sightings south of Lima

Great Egret Ardea alba Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Little Blue Heron Egretta caerulea Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Snowy Egret Egretta thula Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Pelecanidae

Peruvian Pelican Pelecanus thagus Common at Pucusana. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Sulidae

Peruvian Booby Sula variegata Common at Pucusana

Blue-footed Booby Sula nebouxii Great views on the Pucusana island

Phalacrocoracidae

Neotropic Cormorant Phalacrocorax brasilianus Seen at Villa Marshes and along the coast of Lima city

Red-legged Cormorant Phalacrocorax gaimardi Nice views in Pucusana. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Guanay Cormorant Leucocarbo bougainvillii Close-up views in Pucusana. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Cathartidae

Turkey Vulture Cathartes aura Several sightings

Black Vulture Coragyps atratus Several sightings

Greater Yellow-headed Vulture Cathartes melambrotus One individual was seen on our way to the Atalaya stakeout.

Accipitridae

Swallow-tailed Kite Elanoides forficatus Great views of three individuals below CORL

Cinereous Harrier Circus cinereus One seen at Huacarpay Lake

Plumbeous Kite Ictinia plumbea Good views on the way to Villa Carmen Biological Station

Solitary Eagle Buteogallus solitarius Nice views of one individual at Rocotal above CORL. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Roadside Hawk Rupornis magnirostris Common during our drive from CORL to the Atalaya stakeout

Harris’s Hawk Parabuteo unicinctus Seen south of Lima

Variable Hawk Geranoaetus polyosoma One sighting only during our drive from Cusco to the Manu Road

Black-chested Buzzard-Eagle Geranoaetus melanoleucus Seen at Collepata on our way to the Manu Road

White-throated Hawk Buteo albigula Seen between Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station and the tunnels

Eurypygidae

Sunbittern Eurypyga helias A great encounter with two individuals of this most-wanted species at the Alto Madre de Dios River from the Pilcopata bridge

Rallidae

Plumbeous Rail Pardirallus sanguinolentus Good views at Huacarpay Lake

Grey-necked Wood Rail Aramides cajaneus Seen around the pond at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Andean Coot Fulica ardesiaca Common at Huacarpay, Puerto Viejo and Pantanos de Villa wetlands

Common Gallinule Gallinula galeata Common at Huacarpay, Puerto Viejo and Pantanos de Villa wetlands

Purple Gallinule Porphyrio martinica Seen around the pond at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Aramidae

Limpkin Aramus guarauna Seen at the pond at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Haematopodidae

American Oystercatcher Haematopus palliatus Seen at Puerto Viejo and Pantanos de Villa beach

Blackish Oystercatcher Haematopus ater Seen at the rocky shores of Pucusana

Recurvirostridae

Black-necked Stilt Himantopus mexicanus Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Charadriidae

Andean Lapwing Vanellus resplendens Seen around Huacarpay Lake

Killdeer Charadrius vociferus Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Scolopacidae

Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus Seen at Puerto Viejo and Pantanos de Villa

Spotted Sandpiper Actitis macularius Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres Seen at Pucusana on rocky shores and boats

Laridae

Black Skimmer Rynchops niger Nice views at Pantanos de Villa

Andean Gull Chroicocephalus serranus Common at Huacarpay Lake and along the Urubamba River

Belcher’s Gull Larus belcheri Common along the coast of Lima. Found in Peru and Chile. Previously called Band-tailed Gull

Grey-headed Gull Chroicocephalus cirrocephalus Seen at Pantanos de Villa. Here the nominate subspecies

Kelp Gull Larus dominicanus Seen along the coast of Lima. Here the nominate subspecies

Grey Gull Leucophaeus modestus Seen along the Puerto Viejo beach

Laughing Gull Leucophaeus atricilla Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Inca Tern Larosterna inca Close-up views from the Pucusana stakeout and along the coast of Lima city by the Rosa Nautica restaurant. Found in Peru and Chile with extremely scarce records in Ecuador

Columbidae

Rock Dove Columba livia Common in towns, villages and cities

Band-tailed Pigeon Patagioenas fasciata Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Plumbeous Pigeon Patagioenas plumbea Seen around CORL gardens

Ruddy Pigeon Patagioenas subvinacea Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Spot-winged Pigeon Patagioenas maculosa Scope views on the upper parts of the Manu Road and around Ollantaytambo

Ruddy Ground Dove Columbina talpacoti Seen around the village of Patria on the lower Manu Road

Croaking Ground Dove Columbina cruziana Seen during our drive from Lima to Pantanos de Villa and Puerto Viejo Wetlands

Bare-faced Ground Dove Metriopelia ceciliae Brief views of two individuals flying by at Huacarpay Lake

White-tipped Dove Leptotila verreauxi Seen at CORL garden. Here the subspecies decipiens

Eared Dove Zenaida auriculata Seen south of Lima

West Peruvian Dove Zenaida meloda Seen in Lima city and around southern fields and wetlands. Fund in Peru and Chile. The local name Cuculí is onomatopoetic.

Opisthocomidae

Hoatzin Opisthocomus hoazin Four birds seen at the main pond at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Cuculidae

Smooth-billed Ani Crotophaga ani Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Groove-billed Ani Crotophaga sulcirostris Seen south of Lima

Squirrel Cuckoo Piaya cayana Seen around CORL

Strigidae

Rufescent Screech Owl Megascops ingens Great views above CORL

Yungas Pygmy Owl Glaucidium bolivianum Seen above Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Burrowing Owl Athene cunicularia Seen along the southern coast of Lima

Nyctibiidae

Great Potoo Nyctibius grandis Crippling views of one adult roosting at daytime with a chick above Atalaya

Andean Potoo Nyctibius maculosus Great views below Rocotal

Caprimulgidae

Swallow-tailed Nightjar Uropsalis segmentata Brief but good predawn views of a male during our drive to the tunnels below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Lyre-tailed Nightjar Uropsalis lyra Excellent views of the male at the regular stakeout above CORL

Band-winged Nightjar Systellura longirostris Predawn views during our hike to Puente Ruinas

Apodidae

Chestnut-collared Swift Streptoprocne rutila Seen above CORL

White-collared Swift Streptoprocne zonaris Seen well at different locations along the Manu Road

Neotropical Palm Swift Tachornis squamata Seen around Villa Carmen Biological Station

Short-tailed Swift Chaetura brachyura Seen below CORL

Trochilidae

Green Hermit Phaethornis guy Seen at the CORL feeders

Reddish Hermit Phaethornis ruber Seen around Villa Carmen Biological Station

Grey-breasted Sabrewing Campylopterus largipennis Seen around Villa Carmen Biological Station

White-necked Jacobin Florisuga mellivora Seen around Villa Carmen Biological Station

Lesser Violetear Colibri cyanotus Seen at the CORL feeders

Sparkling Violetear Colibri coruscans Seen at the CORL feeders

Black-throated Mango Anthracothorax nigricollis Seen around Villa Carmen Biological Station

Wire-crested Thorntail Discosura popelairii Great views of a male in the CORL gardens. It does not go to the feeders.

Fork-tailed Woodnymph Thalurania furcata Seen at the CORL feeders

Golden-tailed Sapphire Chrysuronia oenone Seen in the Villa Carmen Biological Station gardens

Green-and-white Hummingbird Amazilia viridicauda Seen between Puente Ruinas and the Mandor valley. A Peruvian endemic

White-bellied Hummingbird Amazilia chionogaster Common around Aguas Calientes

Many-spotted Hummingbird Taphrospilus hypostictus Seen at the CORL feeders

Amazilia Hummingbird Amazilia amazilia Seen south of Lima. The only resident hummingbird in the Lima city parks and gardens

Sapphire-spangled Emerald Amazilia lactea Seen in the Villa Carmen Biological Station gardens

Speckled Hummingbird Adelomyia melanogenys Seen around the CORL gardens

Peruvian Piedtail Phlogophilus harterti Amazing views of one bird below CORL. A Peruvian endemic. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Violet-fronted Brilliant Heliodoxa leadbeateri Seen at CORL

Chestnut-breasted Coronet Boissonneaua matthewsii Seen near Puente Ruinas and below Pillahuata

Shining Sunbeam Aglaeactis cupripennis Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Collared Inca Coeligena torquata Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Sword-billed Hummingbird Ensifera ensifera Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station. A most wanted species

Violet-throated Starfrontlet Coeligena violifer Seen at the Acjanaco pass

Giant Hummingbird Patagona gigas Seen around the Huacarpay Lake

Amethyst-throated Sunangel Heliangelus amethysticollis Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station and Pillahuata

Rufous-booted Racket-tail Ocreatus addae Common at the CORL feeders

Black-tailed Trainbearer Lesbia victoriae Seen in the Hotel Pakaritampu gardens in Ollantaytambo

Green-tailed Trainbearer Lesbia nuna Seen at the Huacarpay Lake

Bearded Mountaineer Oreonympha nobilis Great views in the gardens of the Hotel Pakaritampu in Ollantaytambo. A Peruvian endemic

Tyrian Metaltail Metallura tyrianthina Common between Acjanaco and Pillahuata on the upper Manu Road

Rufous-capped Thornbill Chalcostigma ruficeps Great views at the entrance of the Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Long-tailed Sylph Aglaiocercus kingii Common around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

White-bellied Woodstar Chaetocercus mulsant Seen at the CORL feeders

Trogonidae

Golden-headed Quetzal Pharomachrus auriceps Great views below Pillahuata

Crested Quetzal Pharomachrus antisianus A family party of this uncommon species was seen above CORL.

Masked Trogon Trogon personatus Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Blue-crowned Trogon Trogon curucui Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Alcedininae

Amazon Kingfisher Chloroceryle amazona Seen from the Pilcopata bridge

Ringed Kingfisher Megaceryle torquata Seen from the Pilcopata bridge

Green Kingfisher Chloroceryle americana Seen from the Pilcopata bridge

Momotidae

Highland Motmot Momotus aequatorialis Seen around Aguas Calientes and below Rocotal

Amazonian Motmot Momotus momota

Andean Motmot Momotus aequatorialis Seen along the Urubamba River between the train station and the old helicopter field

Broad-billed Motmot Electron platyrhynchum Good sighting of one individual below the Atalaya lookout

Galbulidae

Bluish-fronted Jacamar Galbula cyanescens Seen below CORL

Bucconidae

Black-fronted Nunbird Monasa nigrifrons Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Swallow-wing Puffbird Chelidoptera tenebrosa Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station Capitonidae

Versicolored Barbet Eubucco versicolor A nice-looking bird seen well above CORL

Gilded Barbet Capito auratus Seen well at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Ramphastidae

Blue-banded Toucanet Aulacorhynchus coeruleicinctis Seen above Rocotal on the Manu Road

Chestnut-eared Aracari Pteroglossus castanotis Seen on the way to the Atalaya lookout

Grey-breasted Mountain Toucan Andigena hypoglauca Great views below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Picidae

Ocellated Piculet Picumnus dorbignyanus Seen well near Puente Ruinas below Machu Picchu

Fine-barred Piculet Picumnus subtilis Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Yellow-tufted Woodpecker Melanerpes cruentatus Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Little Woodpecker Veniliornis passerinus Seen below Pilcopata

Golden-olive Woodpecker Colaptes rubiginosus Seen around CORL

Crimson-mantled Woodpecker Colaptes rivolii Seen below Pillahuata

Andean Flicker Colaptes rupicola Seen during our drive from Cusco to Paucartambo before reaching the Manu Road

Lineated Woodpecker Dryocopus lineatus Seen during our drive to Villa Carmen Biological Station

Crimson-crested Woodpecker Campephilus melanoleucos Seen from the Atalaya lookout

Falconidae

Northern Crested Caracara Caracara cheriway Seen during our drive from Lima to Pantanos de Villa and Puerto Viejo wetlands

Black Caracara Daptrius ater Seen near Atalaya

Red-throated Caracara Ibycter americanus Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Mountain Caracara Phalcoboenus megalopterus Common during the drive from Cusco to Paucartambo

American Kestrel Falco sparverius One of the most common raptors of high elevation

Psittacidae

Cobalt-winged Parakeet Brotogeris cyanoptera A few sightings in the lowlands

Blue-headed Parrot Pionus menstruus Common between Villa Carmen Biological Station and Atalaya

Plum-crowned Parrot Pionus tumultuosus Great views at Aguas Calientes

Scaly-naped Amazon Amazona mercenarius Several flocks were seen flying high above the Kosñipata valley at mid-elevation of the Manu Road. This is the only Amazona species that reaches high elevation.

Pacific Parrotlet Forpus coelestis Seen during our drive from Lima to Pantanos de Villa and Puerto Viejo wetlands

Mitred Parakeet Psittacara mitratus Common around Aguas Calientes

White-eyed Parakeet Psittacara leucophthalmus Seen flying between Patria and Pilcopata

Chestnut-fronted Macaw Ara severus Nice views from the Atalaya lookout

Blue-and-yellow Macaw Ara ararauna Seen at the Atalaya lookout

Scarlet Macaw Ara macao A pair seen nicely from the Atalaya lookout

Furnariidae

Slender-billed Miner Geositta tenuirostris Seen on the way to Paucartambo

Coastal Miner Geositta peruviana A classic species found in sandy plains along the Pacific desert. We got a couple of sightings at Puerto Viejo beach. A Peruvian endemic

Peruvian Seaside Cinclodes Cinclodes taczanowskii Another classic bird from the Lima coast. This year we got superb, close-up views at the end of the Circuito de Playas on the rocky shores of Chorrillos. A Peruvian endemic. Also called Surf Cinclodes

Cream-winged Cinclodes Cinclodes albiventris Common encounters along the upper parts of the Manu Road

White-winged Cinclodes Cinclodes atacamensis Seen at Paucartambo

Pale-legged Hornero Furnarius leucopus Good views at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Puna Thistletail Asthenes helleri Seen at the Acjanaco pass. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Azara’s Spinetail Synallaxis azarae Seen around Aguas Calientes and at mid-elevation of the Manu Road. One of the classic calls of the montane humid forest. Named after Félix Manuel de Azara (18 May 1746 – 20 October 1821), a Spanish military officer, naturalist, and engineer

Plain-crowned Spinetail Synallaxis gujanensis Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station, where it remained skulking in the bushes

Dark-breasted Spinetail Synallaxis albigularis This widespread and open-habitat species was seen well in the grasslands of Villa Carmen Biological Station.

Marcapata Spinetail Cranioleuca marcapatae Great sightings at Pillahuata not far from the tunnels, where it favors bamboo. A Peruvian endemic

Creamy-crested Spinetail Cranioleuca albicapilla Crippling views in Acjanaco at the entrance of the Manu Road. A Peruvian endemic

Ash-browed Spinetail Cranioleuca curtata Seen in one of the mixed flocks above CORL. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Plain Softtail Thripophaga fusciceps Two seen well at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Rusty-fronted Canastero Asthenes ottonis Seen near the Pikillaqta ruins. A Peruvian endemic

Scribble-tailed Canastero Asthenes maculicauda Seen at the Acjanaco pass

Streak-fronted Thornbird Phacellodomus striaticeps Brief views at Huacarpay Lake

Orange-fronted Plushcrown Metopothrix aurantiaca Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Wren-like Rushbird Phleocryptes melanops Seen well at Pantanos de Villa and Huacarpay

Pearled Treerunner Margarornis squamiger Seen below Pillahuata

Streaked Tuftedcheek Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii This bromeliad specialist was seen in a mixed flock below Pillahuata.

Montane Foliage-gleaner Anabacerthia striaticollis Seen below CORL

Buff-throated Foliage-gleaner Automolus ochrolaemus Only one sighting

Bamboo Foliage-gleaner Anabazenos dorsalis Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Black-billed Treehunter Thripadectes melanorhynchus Brief views below CORL

Streaked Xenops Xenops rutilans Seen near Aguas Calientes, where it is the only Xenops found

Plain Xenops Xenops minutus Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Olivaceous Woodcreeper Sittasomus griseicapillus Seen below CORL

Strong-billed Woodcreeper Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus Seen well at Pillahuata

Montane Woodcreeper Lepidocolaptes lacrymiger The most common woodcreeper at high elevation

Olive-backed Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus triangularis Seen above CORL

Buff-throated Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus guttatus Seen well at Villa Carmen Biological Station Thamnophilidae

Bamboo Antshrike Cymbilaimus sanctaemariae One individual seen briefly in the tall bamboo of Villa Carmen Biological Station

Chestnut-backed Antshrike Thamnophilus palliatus This was hard, but eventually we had good views of a pair below CORL.

Variable Antshrike Thamnophilus caerulescens Great views at Puente Ruinas and the Mandor Valley near Aguas Calientes

Great Antshrike Taraba major Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Bluish-slate Antshrike Thamnomanes schistogynus this classic mixed-flock leader sentinel was seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Plain-winged Antshrike Thamnophilus schistaceus Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Ornate Antwren Epinecrophylla ornata Seen on the way to Villa Carmen Biological Station

Stripe-chested Antwren Myrmotherula longicauda Seen below CORL

Slaty Antwren Myrmotherula schisticolor Brief views at the old Andean Cock-of-the-rock lek

Pygmy Antwren Myrmotherula brachyura Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

White-flanked Antwren Myrmotherula axillaris Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Yellow-breasted Antwren Herpsilochmus axillaris Seen on the way to Villa Carmen Biological Station. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Dot-winged Antwren Microrhopias quixensis Seen in the bamboo beyond Chontachaka

Long-winged Antwren Myrmotherula longipennis Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Grey Antbird Cercomacra cinerascens Just a brief view of this sneaky canopy antbird at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Manu Antbird Cercomacra manu It took a lot of time, but we managed to get a couple of birds along the bamboo trail at Villa Carmen Biological Station.

Blackish Antbird Cercomacra nigrescens Seen below CORL

White-backed Fire-eye Pyriglena leuconota A few glimpses below CORL

White-browed Antbird Myrmoborus leucophrys Seen at the lower parts of the Manu Road

White-lined Antbird Percnostola lophotes Splendid views of a pair a Villa Carmen Biological Station. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Yellow-breasted Warbling Antbird Hypocnemis subflava A few sightings below CORL

Formicariidae

Black-faced Antthrush Formicarius analis Seen briefly at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Rufous-breasted Antthrush (H) Formicarius rufipectus Commonly heard at CORL, but distantly

Barred Antthrush (H) Chamaeza mollissima Distantly heard near Pillahuata

Grallariidae

Red-and-white Antpitta Grallaria erythroleuca Great views below Pillahuata. A Peruvian endemic

White-throated Antpitta (H) Grallaria albigula This was heard only below Rocotal, where there is not much access to adventure out from the road to track it down

Rhinocryptidae

Trilling Tapaculo Scytalopus parvirostris Seen below Wayqecha

Bolivian White-crowned Tapaculo Scytalopus bolivianus Seen skulking above CORL

Puna Tapaculo Scytalopus simonsi Seen at the Acjanaco pass

Tyrannidae

Sclater’s Tyrannulet Phyllomyias sclateri Great views between Puente Ruinas and the Mandor Valley near Aguas Calientes. Named after Philip Lutley Sclater (4 November 1829 – 27 June 1913), who was an English lawyer and zoologist. In zoology he was an expert ornithologist and identified the main zoogeographic regions of the world. He was Secretary of the Zoological Society of London for 42 years, from 1860–1902.

Plumbeous-crowned Tyrannulet Phyllomyias plumbeiceps Seen near Puente Ruinas

Sierran Elaenia Elaenia pallatangae Common around the Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Southern Beardless Tyrannulet Camptostoma obsoletum Seen around the parks of Lima city

White-throated Tyrannulet Mecocerculus leucophrys Nice birds seen at Acjanaco and Pillahuata, where it is common in mixed flocks

White-banded Tyrannulet Mecocerculus stictopterus Seen at Acjanaco and Pillahuata

Tufted Tit-Tyrant Anairetes parulus Seen on our way to the Manu Road

Torrent Tyrannulet Serpophaga cinerea Common along the Urubamba River

Bolivian Tyrannulet Zimmerius bolivianus One bird seen well just below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station, an unusual place and altitude for this species

Marble-faced Bristle Tyrant Pogonotriccus ophthalmicus Seen at Rocotal

Mottle-cheeked Tyrannulet Phylloscartes ventralis Common around Puente Ruinas

Streak-necked Flycatcher Mionectes striaticollis Common below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Olive-striped Flycatcher Mionectes olivaceus It usually replaces the previous species at lower elevation. One seen well below CORL

Slaty-capped Flycatcher Leptopogon superciliaris Seen around CORL

Inca Flycatcher Leptopogon taczanowskii Great views of one bird near Puente Ruinas. A Peruvian endemic. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Many-colored Rush Tyrant Tachuris rubrigastra Splendid views of this cute little bird in the reeds of Pantanos de Villa and Huacarpay Lake

Flammulated Bamboo Tyrant Hemitriccus flammulatus Seen well at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Scale-crested Pygmy Tyrant Lophotriccus pileatus Very common by voice. Seen below CORL

Black-throated Tody-Tyrant Hemitriccus granadensis Seen at the canopy walkway trail near Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Ochre-faced Tody-Flycatcher Poecilotriccus plumbeiceps Good views above Rocotal

Rusty-fronted Tody-Flycatcher Poecilotriccus latirostris Normally a sneaky skulker, but it was seen well at Villa Carmen Biological Station.

Black-backed Tody-Flycatcher Poecilotriccus pulchellus It was not responding well at the classic spot at the entrance of Chontachaka. It is better to look in suitable habitat in the surroundings of Chontachaka, where it has been reported. We had splendid views at Villa Carmen Biological Station. A Peruvian endemic

Common Tody-Flycatcher Todirostrum cinereum Seen between Patria and Pilcopata on the lower Manu Road

Grey-crowned Flatbill Tolmomyias poliocephalus Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Cinnamon Flycatcher Pyrrhomyias cinnamomeus Common in the cloud forest. A handsome little bird

Black Phoebe Sayornis nigricans Common along the Urubamba River

Smoke-colored Pewee Contopus fumigatus Seen above CORL

Vermilion Flycatcher Pyrocephalus obscurus Seen along the coast of Lima. We also had the chance to see several sooty-morph individuals, which are endemic to the central Pacific coast of Lima as far as Arequipa state.

Andean Negrito Lessonia oreas A great surprise at the shores of Piuray Lake on our way to Ollantaytambo

White-winged Black Tyrant Knipolegus aterrimus A male was seen well around Machu Picchu.

Ochre-naped Ground Tyrant Muscisaxicola flavinucha Seen on the way to Paucartambo

Rufous-naped Ground Tyrant Muscisaxicola rufivertex Good views of one individual at Huacarpay Lake and during our drive to the upper parts of the Manu Road

Streak-throated Bush Tyrant Myiotheretes striaticollis Seen at Acjanaco

Rufous-webbed Bush Tyrant Polioxolmis rufipennis Seen on the way to Paucartambo

Smoky Bush Tyrant Myiotheretes fumigatus One seen well at Rocotal

Maroon-belted Chat-Tyrant Ochthoeca thoracica Nice views at the second tunnel of Pillahuata

Rufous-breasted Chat-Tyrant Ochthoeca rufipectoralis Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

White-browed Chat-Tyrant Ochthoeca leucophrys A few seen around Huacarpay and along the upper parts of the Manu Road

Brown-backed Chat-Tyrant Ochthoeca fumicolor One seen well at Acjanaco

Long-tailed Tyrant Colonia colonus Common at low elevations on the Manu Road, especially between Patria and Pilcopata

Social Flycatcher Myiozetetes similis Seen below CORL

Grey-capped Flycatcher Myiozetetes granadensis Seen around Villa Carmen Biological Station

Great Kiskadee Pitangus sulphuratus Common around Villa Carmen Biological Station

Golden-crowned Flycatcher Myiodynastes chrysocephalus Seen around Aguas Calientes and above CORL

Streaked Flycatcher Myiodynastes maculatus Two encounters

Boat-billed Flycatcher Megarynchus pitangua See at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Lemon-browed Flycatcher Conopias cinchoneti Seen at CORL. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Tropical Kingbird Tyrannus melancholicus Common

Dusky-capped Flycatcher Myiarchus tuberculifer One seen well below Pillahuata

Short-crested Flycatcher Myiarchus ferox Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Pale-edged Flycatcher Myiarchus cephalotes Seen at Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Cotingidae

Red-crested Cotinga Ampelion rubrocristatus One below Acjanaco

Masked Fruiteater Pipreola pulchra A superb encounter with this most-wanted fruiteater between Puente Ruinas and the Mandor Valley. A Peruvian endemic

Band-tailed Fruiteater Pipreola intermedia Seen at the canopy walkway trail near Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Barred Fruiteater Pipreola arcuata Nice views in Pillahuata

Andean Cock-of-the-rock Rupicola peruvianus Nice views of the males displaying at the lek near La Union

Amazonian Umbrellabird Cephalopterus ornatus A female was seen around the CORL garden.

Pipridae

Yungas Manakin Chiroxiphia boliviana Brief but good views of one at the edge of the CORL garden.

Fiery-capped Manakin Machaeropterus pyrocephalus Seen on the way to Villa Carmen Biological Station

Tityridae

Masked Tityra Tityra semifasciata Seen below CORL

Barred Becard Pachyramphus versicolor Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

White-winged Becard Pachyramphus polychopterus Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Vireonidae

Rufous-browed Peppershrike Cyclarhis gujanensis Seen at Rocotal

Red-eyed Vireo Vireo olivaceus Seen below Machu Picchu

Brown-capped Vireo Vireo leucophrys Seen below Rocotal

Corvidae

Violaceous Jay Cyanocorax violaceus Seen at Patria

Inca Jay Cyanocorax yncas Seen below Rocotal

White-collared Jay Cyanolyca viridicyanus Seen below Pillahuata

Purplish Jay Cyanocorax cyanomelas Common around Villa Carmen Biological Station

Hirundinidae

Blue-and-white Swallow Notiochelidon cyanoleuca One of the most common swallows of the west and east slopes of the Andes. Several seen especially in Lima, Aguas Calientes and the Manu Road

White-banded Swallow Atticora fasciata Seen at Pilcopata

Brown-bellied Swallow Notiochelidon murina Seen in the Paucartambo area

White-winged Swallow Tachycineta albiventer Seen along the upper Madre de Dios River in Pilcopata

Southern Rough-winged Swallow Stelgidopteryx ruficollis Seen along the lowest Manu Road

Donacobiidae

Black-capped Donacobious Donacobius atricapilla Nice views at the Villa Carmen Biological Station marsh

Troglodytidae

Thrush-like Wren Campylorhynchus turdinus Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Grey-mantled Wren Odontorchilus branickii Nice views of one in a flock above CORL

Fulvous Wren Cinnycerthia fulva Seen between the station and Pillahuata

Grass Wren Cistothorus platensis Seen at Acjanaco

Inca Wren Pheugopedius eisenmanni It took time, but eventually we managed to get a great view in the Machu Picchu ruins. A Peruvian endemic

Moustached Wren Pheugopedius genibarbis Brief views at Chontachaka

House Wren Troglodytes aedon Seen in Lima city

Mountain Wren Troglodytes solstitialis Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Grey-breasted Wood Wren Henicorhina leucophrys Seen at mid-elevation of the Manu Road and below Machu Picchu

Chestnut-breasted Wren Cyphorhinus thoracicus Brief views on the CORL trails

Mimidae

Long-tailed Mockingbird Mimus longicaudatus Seen around the southern districts of Lima city and at Pucusana

Turdidae

Andean Solitaire Myadestes ralloides One of the classic songs of the Andean cloud forest mountains

Giant Cowbird Molothrus oryzivorus Seen from the Pilcopata bridge

Shiny Cowbird Molothrus bonariensis Several seen in Lima gardens

Scrub Blackbird Dives warczewiczi A few seen around the hotel in Lima. Found in Peru and Ecuador

Yellow-winged Blackbird Agelasticus thilius Seen at Huacarpay Lakes

Coerebidae

Bananaquit Coereba flaveola Seen at CORL

Emberizidae

Rufous-collared Sparrow Zonotrichia capensis One of the most common widespread and successful birds in South America, found from sea level to 5000m and across the humid montane forest on the east slope of the Andes, everywhere but in the Amazon. We got views in Lima, Machu Picchu and the upper parts of the Manu Road.

Yellow-browed Sparrow Ammodramus aurifrons Seen near Patria

Chestnut-capped Brushfinch Arremon brunneinucha Good views in Aguas Calientes near Puente Ruinas

Grey-browed Brushfinch Arremon assimilis Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Grey-eared Brushfinch Atlapetes melanolaemus Common above CORL

Common Bush Tanager Chlorospingus flavopectus Seen above CORL

Yellow-throated Bush Tanager Chlorospingus flavigularis Seen below CORL

Thraupidae

Red-capped Cardinal Paroaria gularis Seen at the Villa Carmen Biological Station marsh

Magpie Tanager Cissopis leverianus Seen below Villa Carmen Biological Station

Slaty Tanager Creurgops dentatus Great views of both male and female at Puente Ruinas. Found in Peru and Bolivia

Superciliaried Hemispingus Hemispingus superciliaris Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Oleaginous Hemispingus Hemispingus frontalis Seen at Puente Ruinas

Black-eared Hemispingus Hemispingus melanotis Seen well above CORL

Three-striped Hemispingus Hemispingus trifasciatus Seen in the area between the station and Pillahuata

Rust-and-yellow Tanager Thlypopsis ruficeps Seen at Aguas Calientes and Pillahuata

Silver-beaked Tanager Ramphocelus carbo Common around CORL

Blue-grey Tanager Thraupis episcopus Common around CORL and Villa Carmen Biological Station

Palm Tanager Thraupis palmarum Common around CORL and Villa Carmen Biological Station

Blue-capped Tanager Thraupis cyanocephala Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Blue-and-yellow Tanager Thraupis bonariensis Seen at Huacarpay Lake

Hooded Mountain Tanager Buthraupis montana Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager Anisognathus igniventris Seen below Acjanaco

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager Anisognathus somptuosus Nice views below Pillahuata

Golden-collared Tanager Iridosornis jelskii Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Chestnut-bellied Mountain Tanager Delothraupis castaneoventris Only one sighting at Pillahuata

Grass-green Tanager Chlorornis riefferii Seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Yellow-throated Tanager Iridosornis analis Nice views of one individual below CORL

Orange-eared Tanager Chlorochrysa calliparaea Very active this season below CORL. Several nice views of this smart-looking bird

Fawn-breasted Tanager Pipraeidea melanonota One sighting in Aguas Calientes, where it is rather uncommon

Turquoise Tanager Tangara mexicana Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Paradise Tanager Tangara chilensis Seen at CORL

Golden Tanager Tangara arthus Seen at the CORL feeders

Golden-eared Tanager Tangara chrysotis Nice views at the CORL feeders where not always seen

Saffron-crowned Tanager Tangara xanthocephala Seen at Puente Ruinas

Spotted Tanager Tangara punctata Seen around CORL

Bay-headed Tanager Tangara gyrola Seen around CORL

Blue-and-black Tanager Tangara vassorii Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Beryl-spangled Tanager Tangara nigroviridis Common above CORL

Blue-necked Tanager Tangara cyanicollis Seen at Puente Ruinas and CORL

Silver-backed Tanager Tangara viridicollis Two sightings near Puente Ruinas

Swallow Tanager Tersina viridis Seen below CORL

Yellow-bellied Dacnis Dacnis flaviventer Nice views by the road at Patria

Black-faced Dacnis Dacnis lineata Seen below CORL

Blue Dacnis Dacnis cayana Seen below CORL

Purple Honeycreeper Cyanerpes caeruleus Seen below CORL

Green Honeycreeper Chlorophanes spiza Seen on the way to Atalaya

Golden-collared Honeycreeper Iridophanes pulcherrimus It’s always great to see this uncommon bird in the CORL vicinity.

Cinereous Conebill Conirostrum cinereum Seen at the agricultural slopes on the way to Paucartambo

Capped Conebill Conirostrum albifrons Seen below Pillahuata

Blue-backed Conebill Conirostrum sitticolor Seen at Acjanaco

Rusty Flowerpiercer Diglossa sittoides Seen in the Hotel Pakaritampu garden

Moustached Flowerpiercer Diglossa mystacalis One sighting at Acjanaco

Black-throated Flowerpiercer Diglossa brunneiventris Seen in the Hotel Pakaritampu garden

Golden-eyed Flowerpiercer Diglossa glauca Only one sighting below CORL

Masked Flowerpiercer Diglossa cyanea Common around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Peruvian Sierra Finch Phrygilus punensis Seen on the way to Paucartambo

Plumbeous Sierra Finch Phrygilus unicolor Seen on the way to Paucartambo

Ash-breasted Sierra Finch Phrygilus plebejus Seen on the way to Paucartambo, where it flocks on agricultural pastures with the previous species

Saffron Finch Sicalis flaveola Seen in the gardens of Lima

Grassland Yellow Finch Sicalis luteola Seen at Puerto Viejo wetlands

Buff-throated Saltator Saltator maximus Seen at the CORL feeders

Greyish Saltator Saltator coerulescens Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Golden-billed Saltator Saltator aurantiirostris Seen at Huacarpay Lake

Blue-black Grassquit Volatinia jacarina Seen between Patria and Pilcopata

Yellow-bellied Seedeater Sporophila nigricollis Seen near Puente Ruinas

Band-tailed Seedeater Catamenia analis Seen at Huacarpay Lake

Chestnut-bellied Seedeater Sporophila castaneiventris Seen at Patria

Chestnut-throated Seedeater Sporophila telasco Seen at the Puerto Viejo wetlands

Chestnut-bellied Seed Finch Oryzoborus angolensis Seen below CORL

Cardinalidae

Tooth-billed Tanager Piranga lutea Seen at Puente Ruinas

White-winged Tanager Piranga leucoptera Seen below CORL

Golden Grosbeak Pheucticus chrysogaster Seen at Huacarpay Lake

Black-backed Grosbeak Pheucticus aureoventris Seen in the garden of the Hotel

Pakaritampu

 

WILDLIFE

Marine otter Lontra felina An amazing encounter with this seldom-seen species on the shores of Pucusana, where we have been lucky enough to find it on a few of our Birding Ecotours trips. Marine otters are found in littoral areas of southwestern South America, close to shore, and in the intertidal areas of northern Peru (from the port of Chimbote) along the entire coast of Chile and the extreme southern reaches of Argentina. Occasional vagrant sightings still occur as far afield as the Falkland Islands. The marine otter mainly inhabits rocky shorelines with abundant seaweed and kelp and infrequently visits estuaries and freshwater rivers. Marine otters are rare and are protected under Peruvian, Chilean, and Argentinean law. In the past they were extensively hunted both for their fur and due to perceived competition with fisheries. Hunting extirpated them from most of Argentina and the Falkland Islands. The species is classified as endangered.

South American sea lion Otaria flavescens or Otaria byronia Also called the southern sea lion, this species is a sea lion found on the Ecuadorian, Peruvian, Chilean, Argentinean, Uruguayan, and Southern Brazilian coasts. It is the only member of the genus Otaria. Several seen at Pucusana

Tayra Eira barbara Nice views in the CORL garden, where this member of the Mustelidae family comes to steal fruit

Central American agouti Dasyprocta punctata Daily sightings in the CORL garden. The term agouti (Spanish: agutí) designates several rodent species of the genus Dasyprocta. They are native to Middle America, northern and central South America, and the southern Lesser Antilles. Some species have also been introduced elsewhere in the West Indies. They are related to guinea pigs and look quite similar, but are larger and have longer legs. The species vary considerably in color, being brown, reddish, dull orange, grayish or blackish, but typically with lighter underparts.

Bolivian squirrel Sciurus ignitus Daily sightings in the CORL garden

Brown capuchin Sapajus apella Daily sightings in the CORL garden. This monkey is sometimes call Tufted capuchin. As traditionally defined, it is one of the most widespread primates in the Neotropics.

Northern Viscacha Lagidium peruanum The northern viscacha is native to central and southern Peru and northern Chile and may also be present in the area around Lake Titicaca in Peru and Bolivia. Its altitude range extends from 300 to 5,000 m (980 to 16,400 ft) above sea level. Seen inside the Machu Picchu ruins

White-eared Solitaire Entomodestes leucotis Great views of one individual below Rocotal

Great Thrush Turdus fuscater Common along upper and mid-elevations of the Manu Road

Chiguanco Thrush Turdus chiguanco Common at Huacarpay and near Cusco city

Glossy-black Thrush Turdus serranus One seen well in the cloud forest of Manu

Black-billed Thrush Turdus ignobilis Seen at Villa Carmen Biological Station

Cinclidae

White-capped Dipper Cinclus leucocephalus Seen along the Urubamba River between the train station and the old helicopter field

Fringillidae

Hooded Siskin Spinus magellanicus Seen at Paucartambo

Olivaceous Siskin Spinus olivaceus Seen at CORL

Orange-bellied Euphonia Euphonia xanthogaster Daily views at the CORL feeders

Thick-billed Euphonia Euphonia laniirostris Seen below CORL

Bronze-green Euphonia Euphonia mesochrysa Seen around CORL

Blue-naped Chlorophonia Chlorophonia cyanea Seen at CORL

Parulidae

Tropical Parula Setophaga pitiayumi Seen in Aguas Calientes

Pale-legged Warbler Myiothlypis signata Seen in Aguas Calientes near Puente Ruinas

Russet-crowned Warbler Myiothlypis coronata Seen in Aguas Calientes near Puente Ruinas

Two-banded Warbler Myiothlypis bivittata Seen below CORL

Three-striped Warbler Basileuterus tristriatus Seen below CORL

Buff-rumped Warbler Myiothlypis fulvicauda Seen at the entrance of Villa Carmen Biological Station

Cuzco Warbler Myiothlypis chrysogaster Seen in the lower parts of Manu Road. A Peruvian endemic

Citrine Warbler Myiothlypis luteoviridis Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Yungas Warbler Basileuterus punctipectus Seen above CORL

Slate-throated Whitestart Myioborus miniatus Seen Aguas Calientes

Spectacled Whitestart Myioborus melanocephalus Seen around Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Icteridae

Peruvian Meadowlark Sturnella bellicosa Seen at Puerto Viejo wetlands

Russet-backed Oropendola Psarocolius angustifrons Common below CORL

Dusky-green Oropendola Psarocolius atrovirens Common in the CORL garden

Crested Oropendola Psarocolius decumanus Seen below CORL

Yellow-rumped Cacique Cacicus cela Seen at Patria

Southern Mountain Cacique Cacicus chrysonotus Only one group seen below Wayqecha Cloud Forest Biological Station

Orange-backed Troupial Icterus croconotus Seen at Patria