Central Peru Trip Report, November 2016

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01 – 20 NOVEMBER 2016

By Eduardo Ormaeche

OVERVIEW

This Central Peru birding tour was Birding Ecotours’ last Peru tour of 2016, and it was a huge success. It was a privilege to be part of this Birding Ecotours adventure, exploring one of the most remote birding routes in the world in the company of great people. During this tour we had the chance to record 443 species and additional five species that were heard only, including 41 country endemics and several range-restricted species as well as near-endemics and endangered species.

 

THE TOUR

We arrived in Lima and spent a night in our comfortable hotel in Miraflores, south of downtown Lima, which was our rendezvous point for this trip.

The next day we met very early, around 4:30 a.m., in the lobby of the hotel, and as soon as we left the city we took the Pan American Highway toward Lomas de Lachay, which is a national reserve located 105 kilometers north of Lima. Before reaching the reserve we made a stop at Repsol Chancay, a gas station that has a 24/7 excellent restaurant and shop, for the obligatory morning coffee. After everybody was awake and excited we headed toward the reserve.

We explore the back part of the reserve in the sector of Guayabito. This rocky, dry-slope section is the habitat of Haageocereus lomensis, an endemic cactus of the Peruvian coast that provides habitat and food for the endemic Cactus Canastero, our first target of the morning. Despite this being the right habitat, the bird had proved quite elusive over the last ten years. Other birds this morning included a female Oasis Hummingbird feeding on the cactus flowers, Burrowing Owl, Band-tailed Sierra Finch, and Short-tailed Field Tyrant. After a while we heard the call of Cactus Canastero, and with help of the tape and after only a short hike we found one bird that even posed for the scope. As soon as we had found this species we left the area, ticking Greyish Miner on the way out. Then we took the Pan American Highway again and entered the reserve once more through its principal checkpoint. The stretch between the road and the checkpoint is probably the best and easiest place in the country to see Least Seedsnipe, and we saw several of them in addition to different pairs of Burrowing Owl and our first Coastal Miner. After the checkpoint we found another Band-tailed Sierra Finch, Peruvian Meadowlark, Rufous-collared Sparrow, Vermilion Flycatcher, House Wren, Eared Dove, and Croaking Ground Dove. At the parking lot we had great views of Black-chested Buzzard-Eagle and Mountain Parakeet. A nice surprise was a single Andean Tinamou sneaking around for some leftovers in the parking lot. We then also added Amazilia Hummingbird and Collared Warbling Finch. However, the endemic Thick-billed Miner still proved unpredictable, and we could not find it in Lomas de Lachay.

After lunch we left the reserve and headed towards the Central Highway and Santa Eulalia for an overnight. The village of Santa Eulalia does not offer much service other than a few resorts, where the local families go to chill out on the weekend in high party spirits, so it is better to avoid staying on a weekend. The rest of the week is rather quiet.

The next day we started the drive along the Santa Eulalia – San Pedro de Casta mountain road. On the way to 2000 meters we saw several Scrub Blackbirds, Long-tailed Mockingbirds, Golden Grosbeaks, and American Kestrel. Near Puente Autisha we found the endemic Great Inca Finch, Streak-backed Tit-Spinetail, Yellow-billed Tit-Tyrant, and Collared Warbling Finch. A Thick-billed Miner posing nicely for the scope was a great surprise. Higher up we managed to see Rusty-crowned Tit-Spinetail, Pied-crested Tit-Tyrant, Canyon Canastero, Mourning Sierra Finch, Andean Swift, Bronze-tailed Comet, Sparkling Violetear, and amazing close-up views of Andean Condor passing right above our heads. Unfortunately, despite our efforts the secretive and poorly-known Rufous-breasted Warbling Finch was denied us, but I heard from other observers who had visited the area this year that it is becoming harder to see than it had been during the past few years. Another night in Santa Eulalia provided a Western Barn Owl in the hotel grounds, a bird that is not easy to see in Peru, even if it does occur in Lima city.

Before dawn the next morning we left Santa Eulalia and started driving along the Central Highway, trying to cope with its heavy traffic. After a stop for breakfast in a “Chez Victor” restaurant we reached the Casapalca – Marcapomacocha area at 4500 meters. We hoped that high Andes species where about to come our way, and indeed they did. As soon as we left the road and got onto an unpaved track we found Bright-rumped Yellow Finch, White-winged Diuca Finch, Black Siskin, Plumbeous Sierra Finch, Creamy-winged Cinclodes, and Mountain Caracara.

This is a beautiful landscape, dominated by the Cordillera La Viuda – snow-capped mountains and bog cushions. Sadly the area faces several threats such as heavy mining activities in the surroundings, grazing of llamas, alpacas, and lambs, and the extraction of the bog’s plants for mushroom production. We explored the bog, and not much later we had found our target – one of the most sought-after birds in the world, Diademed Sandpiper-Plover. Near the highest pass we saw the endemic Dark-winged Miner and later Andean Lapwing, Andean Goose, Andean Swallow, Andean Gull, Slender-billed Miner, Buff-breasted Earthcreeper, and the endemic Junin Canastero. Then we were back on the road, and just before reaching Ticlio, the highest mountain pass in Peru at 4818 meters, which hosts the second highest railway in the world, we managed to get amazing views of the endangered White-bellied Cinclodes and Puna Ibis, Puna Snipe, and Rufous-bellied Seedsnipe. With all these goodies in the bag we move to La Oroya for an overnight. La Oroya is a town at 3800 meters that provides good, though basic, accommodation, facilities, and food.

The next day we went Pari at the shores of Lake Junín at 4100 meters to explore the waters in search of the Critically Endangered (IUCN) Junin Grebe. We were absolutely shocked by the incredible numbers of Chilean Flamingos, at least 5000 flying around the lake, painting the scenery red and pink. A great show indeed! By boat we quickly found all the classic Andean waterfowl often seen at the lake, such as Andean Goose, Puna Teal, Crested Duck, Yellow-billed Pintail, Yellow-billed Teal, Andean Duck, a few Silvery Grebes, Andean Coot, and lots of Andean Gulls. And finally, far out into the lake, we managed to feast our eyes on two pairs of the endemic Junin Grebe. Goal!!!

On the way back to Pari we were lucky to spot Andean Avocet and Baird’s Sandpiper. We also got good views of Correndera Pipit, Andean Negrito, Andean Flicker, and the endemic Black-breasted Hillstar along the road back to Junín. With the help of our local contact, who drives the boat, we decided to try for the secretive and poorly-known subspecies of Black Rail that is sometimes treated as a different species called Junin Rail, and after a while we found one individual out in the open. Then we continued our trip toward Huánuco, driving along the upper Huallaga Valley. We arrived at Huánuco and checked into our comfortable hotel.

The next day we left for the Carpish Tunnel, which is a famous birding spot in the cloudforest mountains north of Huánuco at 2800 meters, rich in avifauna. However, the human impact on this place is a tragedy. We found a lot of deforestation due to the boom of the magnolia flower. There are huge pieces of land that have been cleared to farm this flower. In addition, the best place to park the vehicle (if not the only one) has become a rubbish dump, producing terrible smells, and the local magnolia farmers didn’t look very happy with our presence in the area. As a result we could not park our car in the entire area at all and decided to leave towards Tingo Maria. If this situation persists we will be forced to skip birding in this particular area on our trips.

On the way to Tingo Maria we had niece views of Andean Cock-of-the-rock, Fasciated Tiger Heron, White-winged Swallow, and Russet-backed Oropendola. We visited the Tingo Maria National Park and its famous Oilbird cave, where we saw several of them. We also found White-eyed Parakeet and Cliff Flycatcher. Despite the heat of the morning the lowland tropical forest was active, providing Yellow-tufted and Lineated Woodpeckers, Green-backed and Blue-crowned Trogons, Olivaceous Woodcreeper, Plumbeous Kite, Spot-winged Antbird, Grey-crowned Flatbill, and others. By lunchtime we moved to Villa Jennifer in Tingo Maria for two nights. The place provides great birding in its nice grounds and gardens and excellent food.

During our two days here we ticked Yellow-throated Toucan, Golden-collared Toucanet, Chestnut-eared Aracari, Amazonian Motmot, Cream-colored Woodpecker, Lafresnaye’s Piculet, Gilded Barbet, Bluish-fronted Jacamar, Yellow-olive Flatbill, Mouse-colored Tyrannulet, Rufous-fronted Tody-Flycatcher, Limpkin, Capped Heron, Crested Oropendola, Blue-headed and Military Macaws, Reddish Hermit, Golden-tailed Sapphire, Grey-breasted Sabrewing, Masked Tityra, Pale-legged Hornero, Dark-breasted Spinetail, Thrush-like Wren, and Ferruginous Pygmy Owl. At night we had great views of Band-bellied Owl and Tropical Screech Owl before dawn. We much enjoyed our stay at Villa Jennifer, but sadly we had to say goodbye and continue our trip back to Huánuco. En route just before reaching Huánuco we stopped along a dry portion of the valley, where we found Fasciated Wren, White-bellied Hummingbird, and the endemic Spot-throated Hummingbird.

Our next port of call was the famous Bosque Unchog elfin forest patch in the mountains above Huánuco at 3600 meters. This is the most accessible place to see the endemic and sought-after Golden-backed Mountain Tanager. We spent two full days at Bosque Unchog with excellent weather and a great selection of birds, including the endemic Bay-vented Cotinga, Pardusco, Rufous Antpitta, Yellow-scarfed, and Golden-collared Tanagers, Rufous-browed Hemispingus, Coppery Metaltail, Line-fronted Canastero, White-chinned Thistletail, Neblina Tapaculo, White-collared Jay, Paramo Pipit, Slaty Brushfinch, Andean Lapwing, Ochraceous-breasted Flycatcher, Buff-breasted Mountain Tanager, and our main target, Golden-backed Mountain Tanager. We also stopped above the village of Cochabamba for the endemic Brown-flanked Tanager.

Early the next morning we left Huánuco. En route we made select stops to get the endemic Rufous-backed Inca Finch, which showed nicely, and then we stopped for one hour at Bosque Quinua, which is a nice Polylepis patch at the side of the road. This forest holds many of the specialties here. However, there is no access because it is surrounded by wire fence, so we tried to see as many birds as possible from the road. We were lucky with Giant Conebill, Thick-billed Siskin, Baron’s Spinetail, Stripe-headed Antpitta, and Giant Hummingbird. Then we continue our trip and reached La Merced for an overnight. The idea of staying in La Merced was to break the long drive to Oxapampa. La Merced has been heavily deforested, so we only managed to add a few species in the lodge grounds, including Ocellated Piculet, Black-throated Toucanet, Speckled Chachalaca, Silver-beaked Tanager, and White-browed Antbird, and then we ticked Plain-crowned Spinetail near the butterfly farm.

The next morning we left La Merced towards Oxapampa and finally arrived at Ulcumano Ecolodge. This is one of my favorite lodges in Peru by far. The place does not hold huge mixed flocks and the activity ends rather earlier than in other areas, but the selection of birds we saw was topnotch, including the endemic Cloudforest Screech Owl, Brown Tinamou, the endemic Bay Anpitta, the endemic Rufous-vented Tapaculo, the striking White-eared Solitaire, the amazing Chestnut-crested Cotinga, the endemic Masked Fruiteater, Yellow-throated Tanager, Sickle-winged Guan, Spotted Barbtail, and other classic cloudforest species.

After two full days enjoying the birds and the hospitality of Ulcumano Ecolodge we continued our tour to Satipo, which was our base to explore the famous Satipo Road. This mountainous road connects the Satipo lowlands with the Central Andes of Huancayo and La Concepción in the Junín department and provides the same altitudinal change in ecosystems as does the Manu Road, which allowed us to explore different ecosystems during the drive.

During our full day on the Satipo Road we focused on the lowest and mid-elevations, finding a nice selection of species including a female Amazonian Umbrellabird, Magpie, Paradise, Green-and-gold, Bay-headed, and Golden Tanagers, Rufous Motmot, and Montane Foliage-gleaner. Later on we added Blue-banded Toucanet, Crimson-mantled Woodpecker, the endemic Peruvian Wren, Slaty Brushfinch, Andean Guan, Mountain Wren, Pearled Treerunner, Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager, and others before we returned to Satipo for the night.

Our second morning on the Satipo Road had us focus on the middle and high elevations, finding species such as Chestnut Antpitta, the recently-described Junin Tapaculo, Tschudi’s Tapaculo, Rufous Antpitta, and our two main targets for this day, the endemic and range-restricted Eye-ringed Thistletail and Fiery-throated Metaltail. The latter provided cracker views. After the Puente Carrizales we continued along the Satipo Road until near Runatullo, where we had great views of the as-yet-still-undescribed Milpo Tapaculo (although this bird has been known for over 25 years).

With all the Satipo goodies in the bag and after a long drive, during which we, however, admired great scenery, we arrived at La Concepción to enjoy a nice meal in our comfortable hotel and a hot cup of tea. Many people take a coca tea when traveling to the high Andes, and today it is normal to be offered a cup of coca teal in local hotels. It is suggested that the coca tea helps against altitude sickness and digestion problems, but on this trip we found an incredible recipe for digestion problems due to altitude sickness: muña tea. Muña is a kind of wild mint, and it helps to sort out digestive problems and acclimatization problems.

The next day we went to explore the Pariahuanca Road east of Concepción. This remote road in the Mantaro Valley took us to the habitat of the endemic Black-spectacled Brushfinch, and it did not take long to find this great bird at close distance. Other interesting species were the endemic Creamy-crested Spinetail and several Golden-billed Saltators. We continued along the unpaved mountain road towards the village of Chillifruta, where after some hard work we managed to find a pair of the undescribed subspecies of Plain-tailed Wren that is treated by some authorities as a different species, Mantaro Wren. We had brief but decent views of a pair and also of the subspecies of Streaked-fronted Thornbird that is also known as Mantaro Thornbird. After this birding session we left La Concepción and headed back to La Oroya, where we spent the night.

Our last day in the Andes took us back to the Marcapomacocha area, but this time to explore the Milloc Road in the search of one of the most sought-after endemics of Peru, White-cheeked Cotinga, discovered in the 1960s by the late Maria Koepcke, which occurs in the upper parts of the Santa Eulalia Valley. A trip to this area is possible from Lima and could be done just after our visit to Santa Eulalia at the beginning of the tour, but this would imply staying in a decidedly rural community with poor facilities. So we rather do it our own way. The plan was to arrive at the Polylepis forest at 8.00 a.m., and we did enjoy views of the endemic Black Metaltail, Shining Sunbeam, Grey-breasted Seedsnipe, Variable Hawk, and three White-cheeked Cotingas! En route toward Lima in the Santa Eulalia area we found a pair of Torrent Duck and White-winged Cinclodes. We arrived in Lima tired but in high spirits and very happy.

On our very last day of the tour we went to the coast to get some numbers, and it was worth it. We explored the Pucusana fishing village, adding Humboldt Penguin, close-up views of Inca Tern, Neotropic, Red-legged, and Guanay Cormorants, Belcher’s Gull, Kelp Gull, and Blackish Oystercatcher. Our classic boat ride around the bay provided Ruddy Turnstone, Peruvian Pelican, the endemic Peruvian Seaside Cinclodes, Peruvian Booby, and a nice surprise of a male Blue-footed Booby seen nicely. We were very lucky to see a marine otter, which is rather elusive and seldom seen, and we enjoyed views of a colony of South American sea lions. This is a nice example of fishermen not killing sea lions because of the competition for fish and the possible attacks of sea lions on their nets, but they realized that not only locals but also foreigners come and hire their services for boat rides to see the sea lions, so they have some extra income. As a result they do not disturb the sea lions while fishing in the bay.

We left Pucusana and made a quick stop in some fields near Pachacamac, adding Chestnut-throated Seedeater, Pacific Parrotlet (a feral population), Northern Crested Caracara, Plumbeous Rail, and Bran-colored Flycatcher.

Finally our visit to the Villa Marshes Nature Reserve, which is a Ramsar site within the southern borders of the city, providing shelter to migratory bird species and harboring dozens of resident birds like egrets and ducks. We finished with the gorgeous Many-colored Rush Tyrant, the skulking Wren-like Rushbird, White-cheeked Pintail, Cinnamon Teal, Black-necked Stilt, American Oystercatcher, White-tufted, Pied-billed, and Great Grebes, Black-crowned and Yellow-crowned Night-Herons, Little Blue Heron, Grey-headed Gull, Yellow-hooded Blackbird, and Peruvian Thick-knee. A nice end to a memorable trip!

 

CENTRAL PERU SYSTEMATIC LIST, NOVEMBER 2016

Taxonomy: IOC, International Ornithological Congress, 6.4

Abbreviations:

(H) Heard only (E) Country endemic

T1NAMIFORMES

Tinamidae

Andean Tinamou Nothoprocta pentlandii Amazing views of one individual in the Lomas de Lachay National Reserve. Here the subspecies oustaleti, which is seasonal

Brown Tinamou Crypturellus obsoletus Amazing views of one bird in response to the tape at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies ochiventris

Hooded Tinamou (H) Nothocercus nigrocapillus Heard distantly at Ulcumano Ecolodge above Oxapampa. Here the nominate subspecies. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

ANSERIFORMES

Anatidae

Torrent Duck Merganetta armata Fantastic views of a pair in the upper Santa Eulalia River. Here the subspecies leucogenis

Andean Goose Chloephaga melanoptera Always a pleasure to see. Great views in the Marcapomacocha area and at Lake Junín

Crested Duck Lophonetta specularioides Great views at the shores of Lake Junín. Here the subspecies alticola

Cinnamon Teal Anas cyanoptera Seen at Pantanos de Villa. Here the subspecies orinoma

White-cheeked Pintail Anas bahamensis Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Yellow-billed Teal Anas flavirostris Seen at the shores of Lake Junín. Here the subspecies oxyptera

Yellow-billed Pintail Anas georgica Seen at the shores of Lake Junín. Here the subspecies spinicauda

Puna Teal Anas puna Seen at Lake Junín

Andean Duck Oxyura ferruginea Seen well at Lake Junín and at Pantanos de Villa

GALLIFORMES

Cracidae

Speckled Chachalaca Ortalis guttata Common in the tropical lowlands, especially in the grounds of our lodges in Tingo Maria and La Merced

Andean Guan Penelope montagnii Seen at mid-elevations along the Satipo Road. Here the subspecies plumosa

Sickle-winged Guan Chamaepetes goudotii About six birds were flushed along the Ulcumano Ecolodge trail. Here the subspecies rufiventris

SPHENISCIFORMES

Spheniscidae

Humboldt Penguin Spheniscus humboldti About seven birds were seen well at Pucusana Island during the boat ride. This is a near-endemic species found only in Peru and Northern Chile. Named after the cold-water current it swims in, which is itself named after the 19th century German naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

PODICIPEDIFORMES

Podicipedidae

Pied-billed Grebe Podilymbus podiceps Seen at Pantanos de Villa. Here the subspecies antarcticus

White-tufted Grebe Rollandia rolland We saw the subspecies chilensis at Pantanos de Villa and the endemic subspecies morrisoni at Lake Junín.

Great Grebe Podiceps major Seen at Pantanos de Villa. Here the nominate subspecies

Junin Grebe (E) Podiceps taczanowskii Great encounters with two pairs of this species in the waters of Lake Junín, to which it is endemic. The world population at the lake is estimated at 250 individuals. Pollution and extreme changes in water quality and levels have been significant factors in this alarming decline. The species is classified as Critically Endangered.

Silvery Grebe Podiceps occipitalis Seen at Lake Junín

PHOENICOPTERIFORMES

Phoenicopteridae

Chilean Flamingo Phoenicopterus chilensis At least 5000 birds were seen in all their splendor at Lake Junín. An amazing natural show indeed! The species is classified as Near-threatened.

PELECANIFORMES

Threskiornithidae

Puna Ibis Plegadis ridgwayi Seen at Pantanos de Villa and Lake Junín

Andean Ibis Theristicus branickii About four birds were seen along the Junín plains. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Ardeidae

Fasciated Tiger Heron Tigrisoma fasciatum One individual was seen along the Huallaga River on our way to Tingo Maria.

Least Bittern Ixobrychus exilis One seen well at Pantanos de Villa

Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Yellow-crowned Night Heron Nyctanassa violacea One seen at Pantanos de Villa

Striated Heron Butorides striata Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Western Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis Common at several locations throughout the trip

Great Egret Ardea alba Seen at Pantanos de Villa and also at the hydroelectric plant of Huinco in the Santa Eulalia Valley

Capped Heron Pilherodius pileatus Great views of this handsome bird at Villa Jennifer

Little Blue Heron Egretta caerulea Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Snowy Egret Egretta thula Common at Pantanos de Villa

Pelecanidae

Peruvian Pelican Pelecanus thagus Common at Pucusana. A near-endemic species found in Peru and Chile. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

SULIFORMES

Sulidae

Peruvian Booby Sula variegata Common at Pucusana

Blue-footed Booby Sula nebouxii Formerly vagrant on the central coast and occasionally found on pelagic trips from Callao, during the El Niño years this species seems to have become regular around Pucusana.

Phalacrocoracidae

Red-legged Cormorant Phalacrocorax gaimardi Seen well at Pucusana. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Guanay Cormorant Leucocarbo bougainvillii Close-up views at Pucusana. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Neotropic Cormorant Phalacrocorax brasilianus Common along the coast of Lima

ACCIPITRIFORMES

Cathartidae

Black Vulture Coragyps atratus Common

Turkey Vulture Cathartes aura Seen at several locations

Greater Yellow-headed Vulture Cathartes melambrotus One sighting in Tingo Maria

Andean Condor Vultur gryphus Amazing views along the Santa Eulalia Valley below San Pedro de Casta. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Accipitridae

Hook-billed Kite Chondrohierax inconatus One sighting at Tingo Maria National Park

Swallow-tailed Kite Elanoides forficatus Beautiful views of this handsome raptor on the way to Tingo Maria

Cinereous Harrier Circus cinereus One bird seen near Lake Junín

Plumbeous Kite Ictinia plumbea Scope views of two birds from the Villa Jennifer grounds

Roadside Hawk Rupornis magnirostris Common in the tropical lowlands

Variable Hawk Geranoaetus polyosoma Seen well at Marcapomacocha

Black-chested Buzzard-Eagle Geranoaetus melanoleucus Seen at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve and in the Santa Eulalia Valley. Here the subspecies australis

GRUIFORMES

Rallidae

Grey-necked Wood Rail Aramides cajaneus Seen at the Villa Jennifer grounds

Black Rail Laterallus jamaicensis The subspecies tuerosi is sometimes treated as a different species called Junin Rail. Great views of one individual in the reeds of Lake Junín near Pari

Plumbeous Rail Pardirallus sanguinolentus One bird was seen by the channel in the Pachacamac fields.

Blackish Rail Pardirallus nigricans One individual came nicely in response to the playback in the swampy area near Tingo Maria.

Purple Gallinule Porphyrio martinica One seen near the botanical garden near La Merced

Common Gallinule Gallinula galeata Common at Pantanos de Villa

Andean Coot Fulica ardesiaca Seen at Pantanos de Villa and Lake Junín

Giant Coot Fulica gigantea Scope views of two individuals in the lagoon at the Ticlio mountain pass

Aramidae

Limpkin Aramus guarauna Seen at Villa Jennifer

CHARADRIIFORMES

Burhinidae

Peruvian Thick-knee Burhinus superciliaris A near-endemic, found in Peru and Ecuador only. We had excellent views along the coast of Lima.

Haematopodidae

Blackish Oystercatcher Haematopus ater Seen at Pucusana

American Oystercatcher Haematopus palliatus Seen at Pantanos de Villa beach

Recurvirostridae

Black-necked Stilt Himantopus mexicanus Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Andean Avocet Recurvirostra andina Terrific views at Lake Junín

Charadriidae

Andean Lapwing Vanellus resplendens Common at higher elevations

Killdeer Charadrius vociferus Seen at Pantanos de Villa. Here the subspecies peruvianus

Puna Plover Charadrius alticola Splendid views at Lake Junín

Diademed Sandpiper-Plover Phegornis mitchellii One of the main targets of the tour, as it is considered one of the most sought-after species in this part of the world. It took a while this year, but at the end we had scope views of one in Marcapomacocha The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Pied Plover Hoploxypterus cayanus One seen along the river banks of the Perené River on the way to Satipo

Jacanidae

Wattled Jacana Jacana jacana Two seen near Tingo Maria

Thinocoridae

Rufous-bellied Seedsnipe Attagis gayi What a hike! But we managed to see two birds in our usual spot in the Ticlio bog. Here the subspecies simonsi. The subspecies latreilli from Northern Ecuador, which is often seen at the Papallacta pass, is a contender to be split to become a different species.

Grey-breasted Seedsnipe Thinocorus orbignyianus A few seen at Milloc between the Marcapomacocha area and the Santa Eulalia Valley. Here the subspecies ingae

Least Seedsnipe Thinocorus rumicivorus Common at Lomas de Lachay. Here the subspecies cuneicauda

Scolopacidae

Puna Snipe Gallinago andina One bird was flushed at the Marcapomacocha bog.

Whimbrel Numenius phaeopus Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Greater Yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca Seen at Lake Junín

Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes Seen at Lake Junín

Spotted Sandpiper Actitis macularius One seen on the way to Tingo Maria

Ruddy Turnstone Arenaria interpres Seen at Pucusana

Surfbird Aphriza virgata Seen at Pucusana

Baird’s Sandpiper Calidris bairdii Nice views at Lake Junín

Wilson’s Phalarope Phalaropus tricolor Seen at Lake Junín

Laridae

Andean Gull Chroicocephalus serranus Common at higher elevations

Grey-headed Gull Chroicocephalus cirrocephalus Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Grey Gull Leucophaeus modestus Seen at Pucusana and Pantanos de Villa

Kelp Gull Larus dominicanus Seen along the coast of Lima

Belcher’s Gull Larus belcheri A near-endemic found in Peru and Chile. This species was seen well along the coast of Lima. Named after the 18th-century British navy sailor and naturalist Edward Belcher. The bird used to be called Band-tailed Gull.

Inca Tern Larosterna inca Close-up views of this gorgeous bird from the stakeout in Pucusana. Distant birds were seen also along the coast of Lima. A near-endemic found in Peru and Chile. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

COLUMBIFORMES

Columbidae

Rock Dove Columba livia Common

Band-tailed Pigeon Patagioenas fasciata Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies albilinea

Pale-vented Pigeon Patagioenas cayennensis Seen in Tingo Maria

Plumbeous Pigeon Patagioenas plumbea Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Spot-winged Pigeon Patagioenas maculosa Two seen along the drive from Milloc to Santa Eulalia

Bare-faced Ground Dove Metriopelia ceciliae Handsome indeed! Two were seen at Puente Autisha in Santa Eulalia.

Croaking Ground Dove Columbina cruziana Seen in Lomas de Lachay and Santa Eulalia

Ruddy Ground Dove Columbina talpacoti Daily views at Villa Jennifer

Black-winged Ground Dove Metriopelia melanoptera Nice scope views of one individual in the upper Santa Eulalia Valley. Here the nominate subspecies

White-tipped Dove Leptotila verreauxi Seen in the lower Santa Eulalia Valley

Grey-fronted Dove Leptotila rufaxilla Seen at Tingo Maria National Park. Here the subspecies dubusi

Eared Dove Zenaida auriculata Common along the coast and numerous at Lomas de Lachay. Here the subspecies hypoleuca

West Peruvian Dove Zenaida meloda Common along the Peruvian cost. One of the most numerous birds of Lima city. Its local name is “cuculi”, which is onomatopoeic, derived from its vocalization.

CUCULIFORMES

Cuculidae

Greater Ani Crotophaga major Seen near Tingo Maria

Groove-billed Ani Crotophaga sulcirostris Seen along the dry coast of Lima, especially on fields and plantations and even in parks in Lima city

Smooth-billed Ani Crotophaga ani Seen in the tropical lowlands, especially at Satipo and Tingo Maria

Striped Cuckoo Tapera naevia One bird seen well in response to the tape along the first kilometers of the Satipo Road

Squirrel Cuckoo Piaya cayana Seen at several locations on the east slope of the Andes

STRIGIDAE

Tytonidae

Western Barn Owl Tyto alba Great views of this widespread but hard-to-see owl (at least in Peru) in the grounds of our hotel in Santa Eulalia. This is one of the benefits to start before dawn.

Strigidae

Tropical Screech Owl Megascops choliba Great views at the Villa Jennifer grounds. Predawn owling was very good as always.

Cloud-forest Screech Owl Megascops marshalli Superb views of this localized and seldom-seen species at Ulcumano Ecolodge in Oxapampa. Almost a country endemic with only an isolated population in Bolivia. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Rufous-banded Owl (H) Strix albitarsis This species was heard distantly at Ulcumano Ecolodge above Oxapampa. Here the subspecies opaca

Band-bellied Owl Pulsatrix melanota Great views at Villa Jennifer, and it was heard in La Merced.

Peruvian Pygmy Owl Glaucidium peruanum Seen nicely, including brown and rufous morphs, in the Santa Eulalia Valley

Ferruginous Pygmy Owl Glaucidium brasilianum Seen at Villa Jennifer

Burrowing Owl Athene cunicularia Common at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve

CAPRIMULGIFORMES

Steatornithidae

Oilbird Steatornis caripensis Several were seen in the cave at Tingo Maria National Park.

Nyctibiidae

Common Potoo Nyctibius griseus Seen well in response to the tape at the Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the nominate subspecies

Caprimulgidae

Lesser Nighthawk Chordeiles acutipennis Roosting individuals were flushed in the fields south of Lima.

Pauraque Nyctidromus albicollis Seen at Villa Jennifer

Tschudi’s Nightjar Systellura decussata Seen before dusk in the lowest Santa Eulalia Valley. This former costal subspecies has recently been split from Band-winged Nightjar Systellura longirostris and is found only on the coasts of Peru and Chile. Another near-endemic

APODIFORMES

Apodidae

White-collared Swift Streptoprocne zonaris Several sightings in the lowlands

Chestnut-collared Swift Streptoprocne rutila A few seen between Oxapampa and Satipo

Grey-rumped Swift Chaetura cinereiventris Seen at Villa Jennifer

Andean Swift Aeronautes andecolus See above the Santa Eulalia Valley

Neotropical Palm Swift Tachornis squamata Seen at Villa Jennifer

Trochilidae

Reddish Hermit Phaethornis ruber Daily views at Villa Jennifer

Grey-breasted Sabrewing Campylopterus largipennis Brief views at Villa Jennifer

Lesser Violetear Colibri cyanotus Seen in the Huánuco area. Lesser Violetear is split from (monotypic) Mexican [Green] Violetear C. thalassinus (Remsen et al. 2015, NACC-C-10). The population from Mexico to Nicaragua is Mexican Violetear and from Costa Rica to Bolivia Lesser Violetear.

Sparkling Violetear Colibri coruscans Surprisingly scarce on this trip with only a few sightings in the Santa Eulalia Valley and the cloudforest areas. The bully of the feeders. Sadly there are no hummingbird feeders in Central Peru.

Black-throated Mango Anthracothorax nigricollis Brief views at Villa Jennifer

Fork-tailed Woodnymph Thalurania furcata Brief views at Villa Jennifer

Golden-tailed Sapphire Chrysuronia oenone Brief views at Villa Jennifer

Spot-throated Hummingbird (E) Leucippus taczanowskii Seen along the dry portions of the Huallaga Valley near Huánuco

White-bellied Hummingbird Amazilia chionogaster Seen along the dry portions of the Huallaga Valley near Huánuco

Amazilia Hummingbird Amazilia amazilia Seen in the grounds of our lodge in Santa Eulalia

Sapphire-spangled Emerald Amazilia lactea Seen at Villa Jennifer

Speckled Hummingbird Adelomyia melanogenys Seen in the cloudforest such as at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Chestnut-breasted Coronet Boissonneaua matthewsii Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Shining Sunbeam Aglaeactis cupripennis One seen well along the upper parts of the Santa Eulalia Valley near Milloc

Andean Hillstar Oreotrochilus estella One bird was seen during our hike at Bosque Unchog. Here the subspecies stolzmanni

Black-breasted Hillstar (E) Oreotrochilus melanogaster Terrific views of this country endemic feeding on the orange flowers that grow on the dry slopes of Pari at Lake Junín and at Marcapomacocha as well. An exclusive bird of the Central Peru tour

Bronzy Inca Coeligena coeligena Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge.

Collared Inca Coeligena torquata Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge and at mid-elevations of the Satipo Road. Here the subspecies insectivora

Violet-throated Starfrontlet Coeligena violifer Seen at Bosque Unchog. Here the subspecies dichroura

Sword-billed Hummingbird Ensifera ensifera Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Giant Hummingbird Patagona gigas Seen above San Pedro de Casta and at the Polylepis forest near Huánuco

Amethyst-throated Sunangel Heliangelus amethysticollis Seen at the Carpish Tunnel

Emerald-bellied Puffleg Eriocnemis aline Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies dybowskii

Green-tailed Trainbearer Lesbia nuna Seen along the upper parts of the Satipo Road and on the way to Concepción

Bronze-tailed Comet (E) Polyonymus caroli Great views below San Pedro de Casta. A country endemic exclusive to the Central Peru tour

Tyrian Metaltail Metallura tyrianthina Seen at Bosque Unchog and the Satipo Road. Here the subspecies smaragdinicollis

Coppery Metaltail (E) Metallura theresiae Great views at Bosque Unchog. This species is found in northern and central Peru. A country endemic

Fiery-throated Metaltail Metallura eupogon Great views of a male in our usual spot at Puente Carrizales. A country endemic and exclusive to the Satipo road

Black Metaltail (E) Metallura phoebe Great views of one individual at the Polylepis patch near Milloc between the Santa Eulalia Valley and Marcapomacocha. A country endemic

Olivaceous Thornbill Chalcostigma olivaceum A brief view of one individual on the tiny flowers that grow on the bog in the Marcapomacocha area

Long-tailed Sylph Aglaiocercus kingii Seen well at the Ulcumano Ecolodge

Oasis Hummingbird Rhodopis vesper Seen at low and mid-elevations of the Santa Eulalia Valley. Here the nominate subspecies. A near-endemic species found in Peru and Chile

Peruvian Sheartail Thaumastura cora Good views of two males in the Santa Eulalia Valley below San Pedro de Casta

Purple-collared Woodstar Myrtis fanny A female was seen well at mid-elevations of the Santa Eulalia Valley.

TROGONIFORMES

Trogonidae

Golden-headed Quetzal Pharomachrus auriceps Seen well at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the nominate subspecies

Masked Trogon Trogon personatus Seen at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road

Green-backed Trogon Trogon viridis Good views at Tingo Maria National Park

Blue-crowned Trogon Trogon curucui Seen well at Tingo Maria National Park

CORACIIFORMES

Alcedinidae

Amazon Kingfisher Chloroceryle amazona Seen along the Perené River on the way to Satipo

Momotidae

Rufous Motmot Baryphthengus martii Great views in the lower parts of the Satipo Road Amazonian Motmot Momotus momota Seen at Villa Jennifer

Andean Motmot Momotus aequatorialis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies chlorolaemus

PICIFORMES

Galbulidae

Bluish-fronted Jacamar Galbula cyanescens Seen well at Villa Jennifer

Bucconidae

Black-fronted Nunbird Monasa nigrifrons Seen at Villa Jennifer

Capitonidae

Gilded Barbet Capito auratus Great views at Villa Jennifer. Here the subspecies orosae

Ramphastidae

Black-throated Toucanet Aulacorhynchus atrogularis Seen well at La Merced

Blue-banded Toucanet Aulacorhynchus coeruleicinctis Seen at the lower parts of the Satipo Road

Chestnut-eared Aracari Pteroglossus castanotis Daily views at Villa Jennifer

Golden-collared Toucanet Selenidera reinwardtii Great views at Villa Jennifer

Yellow-throated Toucan Ramphastos ambiguus Good views at Villa Jennifer and also heard at Tingo Maria National Park. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Picidae

Lafresnaye’s Piculet Picumnus lafresnayi Seen at Villa Jennifer

Ocellated Piculet Picumnus dorbignyanus Seen in the grounds of our lodge in La Merced

Yellow-tufted Woodpecker Melanerpes cruentatus Seen well at Villa Jennifer

Golden-olive Woodpecker Colaptes rubiginosus Seen in the cloudforest of the Satipo Road

Crimson-mantled Woodpecker Colaptes rivolii Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Lineated Woodpecker Dryocopus lineatus Seen well at Tingo Maria National Park

Black-necked Woodpecker (E) Colaptes atricollis Good views at mid-elevations in the Santa Eulalia Valley. A country endemic

Andean Flicker Colaptes rupicola Seen in Marcapomacocha and at the upper parts of the Satipo Road. Here the subspecies puna

Cream-colored Woodpecker Celeus flavus Seen well at Tingo Maria National Park

FALCONIFORMES

Falconidae

Black Caracara Daptrius ater Seen at Villa Jennifer

Mountain Caracara Phalcoboenus megalopterus Seen in the Casapalca – Marcapomacocha area

Yellow-headed Caracara Milvago chimachima A few sightings between La Merced and Oxapampa

Red-throated Caracara Ibycter americanus Two seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Probably this is a new extension of its regular altitude range, as this species is considered an Amazon lowland bird, and according to the field guide of the birds of Peru reaches only 1500 meters, while the altitude range of Ulcumano is 2100 to 2500 meters.

Northern Crested Caracara Caracara cheriway One individual seen at Pachacamac

Collared Forest Falcon (H) Micrastur semitorquatus One heard before dusk at Ulcumano Ecolodge

American Kestrel Falco sparverius Common on the west slope of the Andes

PSITTACIFORMES

Psittacidae

Mountain Parakeet Psilopsiagon aurifrons Seen at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve

Blue-headed Parrot Pionus menstruus Seen at Villa Jennifer. Here the nominate subspecies

Scaly-naped Amazon Amazona mercenarius Two birds were seen flying near above the Carpish Tunnel.

Pacific Parrotlet Forpus coelestis Two birds were seen in the Pachacamac fields. This is a feral population as a result of escaped cage birds. They occur in Southern Ecuador and Northern Peru.

Blue-headed Macaw Primolius couloni Daily views at Villa Jennifer, which is probably the easiest location to see this species in the country. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Military Macaw Ara militaris Three individual flybys at Tingo Maria National Park. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

White-eyed Parakeet Psittacara leucophthalmus Close-up views of many at the entrance of the Oilbird cave at Tingo Maria National Park

Red-masked Parakeet Psittacara erythrogenys A few individuals were seen in the park of Miraflores in front of our hotel. This is a feral population as result of escaped cage birds that has been established in Lima for the last 30 years. They are near-endemic, found only in Southern Ecuador and Northern Peru. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Scarlet-fronted Parakeet Psittacara wagleri Two were seen well at mid-elevations of the Santa Eulalia Valley.

PASSERIFORMES

Furnariidae

Cream-winged Cinclodes Cinclodes albiventris Common at higher elevations

White-winged Cinclodes Cinclodes atacamensis Seen in the water reservoir in the upper Santa Eulalia Valley on the last day

White-bellied Cinclodes (E) Cinclodes palliatus Great views of this splendid bird in the bog of Ticlio. A country endemic, restricted to the high elevations of the border of the Lima and Junín departments. The species is classified as Critically Endangered, with a world population of around 200 individuals.

Common Miner Geositta cunicularia Nice views near Pari at Lake Junín. Here the subspecies juninensis

Coastal Miner (E) Geositta peruviana Common at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve. A country endemic

Greyish Miner Geositta maritima One bird was seen well in the Guayabito sector of the Lomas de Lachay National Reserve.

Thick-billed Miner (E) Geositta crassirostris After we failed to find the bird in Lomas de Lachay we were rewarded with great views in the Santa Eulalia Valley. A country endemic

Dark-winged Miner (E) Geositta saxicolina Two birds were seen in the Marcapomacocha area. A country endemic, restricted to central Peru

Slender-billed Miner Geositta tenuirostris Seen at Marcapomacocha. Here the nominate subspecies

Buff-breasted Earthcreeper Upucerthia validirostris Great views in Marcapomacocha

Striated Earthcreeper (E) Geocerthia serrana Brief views of one bird in the Polylepis patch between Milloc and the upper Santa Eulalia Valley at 3800 meters elevation. A country endemic

Peruvian Seaside Cinclodes (E) Cinclodes taczanowskii Good views of one individual during our boat ride in Pucusana. A country endemic. This bird is also called Surf Cinclodes.

Pale-legged Hornero Furnarius leucopus Daily views in the Villa Jennifer grounds. Here the subspecies tricolor

Rusty-crowned Tit-Spinetail (E) Leptasthenura pileata Good views of a pair in the Santa Eulalia Valley below San Pedro de Casta. A country endemic

Streak-backed Tit-Spinetail Leptasthenura striata Two individuals were seen near Puente Autisha in the Santa Eulalia Valley below San Pedro de Casta. A near-endemic found in Peru and Chile

White-chinned Thistletail Asthenes fuliginosa Seen at Bosque Unchog. Here the subspecies plengei

Eye-ringed Thistletail (E) Asthenes palpebralis Brilliant views at Puente Carrizales on the Satipo Road. This is a range-restricted species and country endemic.

Canyon Canastero Asthenes pudibunda A glimpse of an elusive bird near San Pedro de Casta

Cactus Canastero (E) Pseudasthenes cactorum It took a while, but after some hard search we were reward with scope views of one individual at Guayabito at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve. A country endemic

Line-fronted Canastero Asthenes urubambensis Great views of two birds in the bunch grass of Bosque Unchog. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Streak-backed Canastero Asthenes wyatti Seen below the Ticlio mountain pass. Here the subspecies graminicola

Junin Canastero (E) Asthenes virgata Excellent views of one bird in the grass of Milloc near Marcapomacocha. A country endemic

Rufous Spinetail Synallaxis unirufa Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Azara’s Spinetail Synallaxis azarae Common in the cloudforest mountains

Dark-breasted Spinetail Synallaxis albigularis Seen at Villa Jennifer

Plain-crowned Spinetail Synallaxis gujanensis Seen in the coffee plantations of La Merced. Here the subspecies huallagae

Creamy-crested Spinetail (E) Cranioleuca albicapilla Great views of a pair on the Pariahuanca Road. This is a country endemic. Here the subspecies albicapilla

Baron’s Spinetail (E) Cranioleuca baroni Seen in the Polylepis forest patch at La Quinua near Huánuco. A country endemic

Rufous-fronted Thornbird Phacellodomus rufifrons Seen at Villa Jennifer. Fairly common in the Marañon and Huallaga Valleys in Northern Peru, it seems to be extending its range to the Huallaga Valley in the Huánuco department.

Streak-fronted Thornbird Phacellodomus striaticeps The population in the Mantaro Valley seems to be a different species from Phacellodomus striaticeps, but further research has to be done to determine the status of the species. Seen at Chillifruta in the Mantaro Valley

Wren-like Rushbird Phleocryptes melanops Seen at Pantanos de Villa

Spotted Barbtail Premnoplex brunnescens Great views at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Pearled Treerunner Margarornis squamiger Good views of this beautiful furnariid at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road

Streaked Tuftedcheek Pseudocolaptes boissonneautii Seen well at Ulcumano Ecolodge and the Satipo Road. A bromeliad specialist

Montane Foliage-gleaner Anabacerthia striaticollis Seen on the lower parts of the Satipo Road

Buff-browed Foliage-gleaner Syndactyla rufosuperciliata Brief views at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Streaked Xenops Xenops rutilans Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies peruvianus

Olivaceous Woodcreeper Sittasomus griseicapillus Seen at Villa Jennifer. Here the subspecies amazonus. Take notes where you see this species, because it is a potential contender for a future split into at least five full species.

Olive-backed Woodcreeper Xiphorhynchus triangularis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Montane Woodcreeper Lepidocolaptes lacrymiger Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge and the Satipo Road. Here the subspecies warscewiczi

Thamnophilidae

Great Antshrike Taraba major A male seen at Tingo Maria National Park

Uniform Antshrike Thamnophilus unicolor Seen at mid-elevations at the Satipo Road

Plain-winged Antshrike Thamnophilus schistaceus Seen well at Villa Jennifer

Variable Antshrike Thamnophilus caerulescens Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies melanchrous

Stripe-chested Antwren Myrmotherula longicauda Seen well in the Chanchamayo Valley

Creamy-bellied Antwren Herpsilochmus motacilloides Decent views of this range-restricted skulker above the coffee plantations in the Chanchamayo Valley near La Merced. A country endemic. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

White-flanked Antwren Myrmotherula axillaris Seen at Tingo Maria National Park

Blackish Antbird Cercomacra nigrescens Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

White-backed Fire-eye Pyriglena leuconota Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

White-browed Antbird Myrmoborus leucophrys Seen in the Chanchamayo Valley near La Merced

Spot-winged Antbird Schistocichla leucostigma Seen at Tingo Maria National Park

Formicariidae

Black-faced Antthrush (H) Formicarius analis Heard only at Villa Jennifer. Here the nominate subspecies

Grallariidae

Stripe-headed Antpitta Grallaria andicolus Seen at Bosque Quinua

Bay Antpitta (E) Grallaria capitalis Hard as always, but with patience we managed to have good views of one individual at Ulcumano Ecolodge. A country endemic restricted to central Peru

Rufous Antpitta Grallaria rufula Seen at Puente Carrizales on the Satipo Road. Here the subspecies obscura. There are six subspecies involved, and further investigation might split some of these subspecies into full species. Keep track of your sightings!

Chestnut Antpitta (E) Grallaria blakei Seen at the upper parts of the Satipo Road. A country endemic. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Rhinocryptidae

Rufous-vented Tapaculo (E) Scytalopus femoralis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. A country endemic

Tschudi’s Tapaculo (E) Scytalopus acutirostris Seen at Puente Carrizales on the Satipo Road. A country endemic. Named after Johann Jakob von Tschudi (25 July 1818 – 8 October 1889), a Swiss naturalist, explorer, and diplomat

Neblina Tapaculo (E) Scytalopus altirostris Seen at Bosque Unchog. A country endemic. This species was restricted to central Peru, but recently it was recorded on the Black Mud Pass in the Amazonas region on our Northern Peru tour.

Junin Tapaculo (E) Scytalopus gettyae Recently described to science in the last five years, this new country endemic was seen well at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road.

Milpo Tapaculo Scytalopus sp.nov. Amazingly still without description, this Scytalopus has been known for over two decades in central Peru. We had great views in the upper parts of the Satipo Road/

Tyrannidae

Yellow-crowned Tyrannulet Tyrannulus elatus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Sierran Elaenia Elaenia pallatangae Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Yellow-bellied Elaenia Elaenia flavogaster Seen at Villa Jennifer

Southern Beardless Tyrannulet Camptostoma obsoletum Seen in the Santa Eulalia Valley

White-throated Tyrannulet Mecocerculus leucophrys Seen at Bosque Unchog.

White-banded Tyrannulet Mecocerculus stictopterus Seen at the Carpish Tunnel

Yellow-billed Tit-Tyrant Anairetes flavirostris Seen in the Santa Eulalia Valley near Puente Autisha

Tufted Tit-Tyrant Anairetes parulus Seen at Bosque Unchog. Here the subspecies aequatorialis

Pied-crested Tit-Tyrant Anairetes reguloides Seen in the Santa Eulalia Valley below San Pedro de Casta. Here the subspecies albiventris

Torrent Tyrannulet Serpophaga cinerea Seen on the way to Tingo Maria

Mouse-colored Tyrannulet Phaeomyias murina Seen at Villa Jennifer. Here the subspecies wagae

Rufous-headed Pygmy Tyrant Pseudotriccus ruficeps Seen at mid-elevations along the Satipo Road

Peruvian Tyrannulet (E) Zimmerius viridiflavus Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. A country endemic

Marble-faced Bristle Tyrant Pogonotriccus ophthalmicus Seen at mid-elevations along the Satipo Road

Mottle-cheeked Tyrannulet Phylloscartes ventralis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Streak-necked Flycatcher Mionectes striaticollis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Inca Flycatcher (E) Leptopogon taczanowskii Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. A country endemic. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Bran-colored Flycatcher Myiophobus fasciatus Great views of one individual on the lower parts of the Santa Eulalia Road

Ochraceous-breasted Flycatcher Nephelomyias ochraceiventris Seen at Bosque Unchog. A near-endemic found in Peru and Bolivia

Many-colored Rush Tyrant Tachuris rubrigastra Seen at Pantanos de Villa. Here the subspecies libertatis

Black-throated Tody-Tyrant Hemitriccus granadensis Seen at mid-elevations along the Satipo Road

Rufous-fronted Tody-Flycatcher Poecilotriccus latirostris Brief views at Villa Jennifer

Common Tody-Flycatcher Todirostrum cinereum Seen at Villa Jennifer and La Merced. Here the subspecies peruanum

Grey-crowned Flatbill Tolmomyias poliocephalus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Yellow-olive Flatbill Tolmomyias sulphurescens Seen at Villa Jennifer. Here the subspecies peruvianus

Cinnamon Flycatcher Pyrrhomyias cinnamomeus Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Cliff Flycatcher Hirundinea ferruginea Seen at the entrance of the Oilbird cave at Tingo Maria National Park. Here the subspecies sclateri

Black Phoebe Sayornis nigricans Seen at mid-elevations along the Santa Eulalia Valley near the hydroelectric plant of Huinco. Here the subspecies angustirostris

Smoke-colored Pewee Contopus fumigatus Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Tropical Pewee Contopus cinereus Seen along the lowest elevations of the Santa Eulalia Valley

Vermilion Flycatcher Pyrocephalus rubinus Seen around Lima city

Andean Negrito Lessonia oreas Seen at Lake Junín

Taczanowski’s Ground Tyrant Muscisaxicola griseus Seen well in the Marcapomacocha area. A near-endemic found in Peru and Bolivia

Cinereous Ground Tyrant Muscisaxicola cinereus Seen well in the Marcapomacocha area

White-browed Ground Tyrant Muscisaxicola albilora One bird was seen in the bog cushion of Marcapomacocha.

Streak-throated Bush Tyrant Myiotheretes striaticollis Seen below San Pedro de Casta in the Santa Eulalia Valley

Black-billed Shrike-Tyrant Agriornis montanus Good views of one individual at Pari at the shores of Lake Junín

Rufous-breasted Chat-Tyrant Ochthoeca rufipectoralis Good views below Bosque Unchog near the village of Cochabamba

White-browed Chat-Tyrant Ochthoeca leucophrys Seen in the Santa Eulalia Valley

D’Orbigny’s Chat-Tyrant Ochthoeca oenanthoides One seen in the Polylepis patch of Japani above the Santa Eulalia Valley. Here the endemic subspecies polionota .Named after Alcide Charles Victor Marie Dessalines d’Orbigny, 19th-century French naturalist, who made major contributions in many areas, including zoology (including malacology), palaeontology, geology, archaeology, and anthropology

Piratic Flycatcher Legatus leucophaius Seen at Villa Jennifer

Short-tailed Field Tyrant Muscigralla brevicauda Seen at Lomas de Lachay

Social Flycatcher Myiozetetes similis Seen at Villa Jennifer and in the Satipo lowlands

Grey-capped Flycatcher Myiozetetes granadensis Seen at Villa Jennifer

Streaked Flycatcher Myiodynastes maculatus Seen at Tingo Maria National Park. Here the subspecies solitarius

Golden-crowned Flycatcher Myiodynastes chrysocephalus Seen on the way to Tingo Maria. Here the nominate subspecies

Tropical Kingbird Tyrannus melancholicus Common

Short-crested Flycatcher Myiarchus ferox Seen at Villa Jennifer

Pale-edged Flycatcher Myiarchus cephalotes Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Cotingidae

Red-crested Cotinga Ampelion rubrocristatus Seen at Bosque Unchog

Chestnut-crested Cotinga Ampelion rufaxilla Scope views at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the nominate subspecies

White-cheeked Cotinga (E) Zaratornis stresemanni Great views of this sought-after target in the Polylepis patch of Japani between Milloc and the Santa Eulalia Valley. A country endemic. This species was described in the late 1960s by the late Maria Koepcke. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Bay-vented Cotinga (E) Doliornis sclateri Amazing views at Bosque Unchog. A range-restricted country endemic found in central Peru only. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Barred Fruiteater Pipreola arcuata Seen at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road

Masked Fruiteater (E) Pipreola pulchra Seen well at Ulcumano Ecolodge. A country endemic

Andean Cock-of-the-rock Rupicola peruvianus Two birds were seen along the main road during our drive to Tingo Maria and then another male was seen on the Satipo Road. Here the nominate subspecies

Amazonian Umbrellabird Cephalopterus ornatus Scope views of one female at lower elevations on the Satipo Road

Tityridae

Masked Tityra Tityra semifasciata Seen at Villa Jennifer

Barred Becard Pachyramphus versicolor Seen at the Carpish Tunnel and at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road

White-winged Becard Pachyramphus polychopterus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Vireonidae

Rufous-browed Peppershrike Cyclarhis gujanensis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Red-eyed Vireo Vireo olivaceus A couple of encounters

Corvidae

White-collared Jay Cyanolyca viridicyanus Seen at Bosque Unchog. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Inca Jay Cyanocorax yncas Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Violaceous Jay Cyanocorax violaceus Common in the tropical lowlands of Tingo Maria

Hirundinidae

White-winged Swallow Tachycineta albiventer Seen in the Huallaga River near Tingo Maria National Park

White-banded Swallow Atticora fasciata Seen at the lowest parts of the Satipo Road

Brown-bellied Swallow Notiochelidon murina Seen at high elevations on the Satipo Road. Here the nominate subspecies

Blue-and-white Swallow Notiochelidon cyanoleuca Common along the Pacific coast including Lima city. Here the subspecies peruviana

Andean Swallow Haplochelidon andecola Great views at Marcapomacocha

Chestnut-collared Swallow Petrochelidon rufocollaris Seen well at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve. A near-endemic, found in Ecuador and Peru only

Southern Rough-winged Swallow Stelgidopteryx ruficollis Seen on the way to Tingo Maria

Troglodytidae

Fasciated Wren Campylorhynchus fasciatus Seen along the dry section of the Huallaga Valley near Huánuco

Thrush-like Wren Campylorhynchus turdinus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Peruvian Wren (E) Cinnycerthia peruana Good views of a family party at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road. A country endemic

Plain-tailed Wren Pheugopedius euophrys The population in the Mantaro Valley seems to be a different species from Pheugopedius euophrys, but further research is needed to determine the status of the species. We found a pair after a hard search at Chillifruta in the Mantaro Valley.

House Wren Troglodytes aedon Several sightings throughout the trip, especially in the pacific and tropical lowlands

Mountain Wren Troglodytes solstitialis Seen at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road

Grey-breasted Wood Wren Henicorhina leucophrys Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the nominate subspecies

Mimidae

Long-tailed Mockingbird Mimus longicaudatus Common along the Santa Eulalia Valley. A near-endemic, found in Ecuador and Peru only

Turdidae

Andean Solitaire Myadestes ralloides One seen in the cloudforest on the Satipo Road. One of the classy bird songs of the Andean cloudforest

White-eared Solitaire Entomodestes leucotis Cracker views of two birds at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Although this handsome species is well distributed through Peru and Bolivia, perhaps Ulcumano Ecolodge is the easiest place to get close-up views of this bird.

Great Thrush Turdus fuscater Common on the east slope of the Andes

Glossy-black Thrush Turdus serranus One seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Chiguanco Thrush Turdus chiguanco Several views below San Pedro de Casta

Black-billed Thrush Turdus ignobilis Seen at Villa Jennifer

Hauxwell’s Thrush Turdus hauxwelli One individual was seen at Villa Jennifer.

Cinclidae

White-capped Dipper Cinclus leucocephalus Always a pleasure to see! We got good views in the rapids of the upper Santa Eulalia River.

Passeridae

House Sparrow Passer domesticus Seen on the way to Santa Eulalia

Motacillidae

Yellowish Pipit Anthus lutescens Seen at the entrance of the Lomas de Lachay National Reserve. Here the subspecies peruvianus

Correndera Pipit Anthus correndera Seen in the Lake Junín area. Here the endemic subspecies calcaratus

Paramo Pipit Anthus bogotensis Two birds seen very well in the Bosque Unchog paramo during the first part of the hike to the tanager

Fringillidae

Olivaceous Siskin Spinus olivaceus Seen along the Satipo Road

Hooded Siskin Spinus magellanicus The most widespread siskin. We had several views throughout the trip.

Black Siskin Spinus atratus Seen at Marcapomacocha and Pari at the shores of Lake Junín

Thick-billed Siskin Spinus crassirostris Scope views of a couple of individuals at La Quinua

Purple-throated Euphonia Euphonia chlorotica Seen at the grounds of our hotel in La Merced

Thick-billed Euphonia Euphonia laniirostris Seen at Villa Jennifer

Orange-bellied Euphonia Euphonia xanthogaster Seen at Villa Jennifer

Parulidae

Tropical Parula Setophaga pitiayumi Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Russet-crowned Warbler Myiothlypis coronata Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Citrine Warbler Myiothlypis luteoviridis Seen on the Satipo Road

Three-striped Warbler Basileuterus tristriatus Seen on the Satipo Road. The population in southeast Peru and Bolivia has been split as Yungas Warbler Basileuterus punctipectus.

Slate-throated Whitestart Myioborus miniatus Several sightings throughout the tour

Spectacled Whitestart Myioborus melanocephalus Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge, Bosque Unchog, and the Satipo Road. Here the nominate subspecies

Icteridae

Peruvian Meadowlark Sturnella bellicosa Seen at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve

Russet-backed Oropendola Psarocolius angustifrons Common in the tropical lowlands

Crested Oropendola Psarocolius decumanus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Dusky-green Oropendola Psarocolius atrovirens Seen in the Chanchamayo Valley on the way to La Merced. A near-endemic found in Peru and Bolivia

Yellow-rumped Cacique Cacicus cela Common in the tropical lowlands

Northern Mountain Cacique Cacicus leucoramphus Seen on the Satipo Road

Solitary Cacique Cacicus solitarius Seen at Villa Jennifer

Orange-backed Troupial Icterus croconotus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Giant Cowbird Molothrus oryzivorus Seen in the lowlands

Shiny Cowbird Molothrus bonariensis A few sightings around Lima

Scrub Blackbird Dives warczewiczi Seen along the Santa Eulalia Valley. This is a near-endemic found in Ecuador and Peru

Yellow-hooded Blackbird Chrysomus icterocephalus One bird was seen at Pantanos de Villa. This is a feral population created by escaped cage birds, which does occurs in wetlands at Lima city. This bird is native to the area of the Amazon River and its tributaries in the Loreto region.

Coerebidae

Bananaquit Coereba flaveola A couple of sightings including in Lima city

Emberizidae

Rufous-collared Sparrow Zonotrichia capensis This species is common from sea level to 5000 meters on the west slope of the Andes and down to 1000 meters on the east slope but is not present in the Amazon rainforest.

Yellow-browed Sparrow Ammodramus aurifrons Seen in La Merced and on the lower Satipo Road

Chestnut-capped Brushfinch Arremon brunneinucha Seen on the Satipo Road. Here the subspecies frontalis

Tricolored Brushfinch Atlapetes tricolor Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge.

Black-spectacled Brushfinch (E) Atlapetes melanopsis Great views along the Pariahuanca Road. A country endemic and only recently described to science in 2002. The species is classified as Endangered.

Slaty Brushfinch Atlapetes schistaceus Seen at Bosque Unchog. Here the subspecies taczanoswki

Common Bush Tanager Chlorospingus flavopectus Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies cinereocephalus

Thraupidae

Magpie Tanager Cissopis leverianus Seen on the lower parts of the Satipo Road

Superciliaried Hemispingus Hemispingus superciliaris Seen at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road

Black-capped Hemispingus Hemispingus atropileus Seen at the Carpish Tunnel

Oleaginous Hemispingus Hemispingus frontalis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Rufous-browed Hemispingus (E) Hemispingus rufosuperciliaris Only one bird was seen during our second day in Bosque Unchog. One of the rarest and hardest Peruvian endemics. The species is classified as Vulnerable.

Brown-flanked Tanager (E) Thlypopsis pectoralis Great views of two birds below Bosque Unchog. A country endemic restricted to central Peru

Pardusco (E) Nephelornis oneilli Common at Bosque Unchog, where is one of the targets to look for. A country endemic

White-lined Tanager Tachyphonus rufus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Huallaga Tanager (E) Ramphocelus melanogaster Daily views at Villa Jennifer. This country endemic is restricted to the Huallaga and Mayo Valleys in the regions of San Martín and Huánuco only. Named after the Huallaga River, one of the most important Amazon tributaries.

Silver-beaked Tanager Ramphocelus carbo Common in the tropical lowlands

Blue-grey Tanager Thraupis episcopus Seen around Lima gardens and in the tropical lowlands

Palm Tanager Thraupis palmarum Common in the tropical lowlands

Blue-capped Tanager Thraupis cyanocephala Seen at mid-elevations on the Satipo Road

Blue-and-yellow Tanager Thraupis bonariensis Seen below San Pedro de Casta in the Santa Eulalia Valley

Hooded Mountain Tanager Buthraupis montana Seen in the cloudforest of the Satipo Road

Golden-backed Mountain Tanager (E) Buthraupis aureodorsalis Of one the most sought-after Peruvian endemics. This year we got cracker views of this range-restricted species. The remote Bosque Unchog is the most accessible site to find this seldom-seen species. One of the largest tanagers of the family after the White-capped Tanager. The species is classified as Endangered.

Lacrimose Mountain Tanager Anisognathus lacrymosus One seen briefly at the Carpish Tunnel

Buff-breasted Mountain Tanager Dubusia taeniata We got brief views of one individual at Bosque Unchog.

Scarlet-bellied Mountain Tanager Anisognathus igniventris Seen at Bosque Unchog. Here the subspecies ignicrissa

Yellow-scarfed Tanager (E) Iridosornis reinhardti Seen at Bosque Unchog. A country endemic restricted to northern and central Peru

Yellow-throated Tanager Iridosornis analis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Golden-collared Tanager Iridosornis jelskii Nice views at Bosque Unchog. A near-endemic, found in Peru and Bolivia only

Turquoise Tanager Tangara mexicana Seen at Villa Jennifer. It does not occur in Mexico.

Golden Tanager Tangara arthus Seen on the lower parts of the Satipo Road

Saffron-crowned Tanager Tangara xanthocephala Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Paradise Tanager Tangara chilensis Seen in the lowlands of Satipo. It does not occur in Chile.

Flame-faced Tanager Tangara parzudakii Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Green-and-gold Tanager Tangara schrankii Seen in the lowlands of Satipo

Spotted Tanager Tangara punctata Seen in the lowlands of Satipo

Bay-headed Tanager Tangara gyrola Seen in the lowlands of Satipo

Beryl-spangled Tanager Tangara nigroviridis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Blue-necked Tanager Tangara cyanicollis Seen at Villa Jennifer

Blue-and-black Tanager Tangara vassorii Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the subspecies branickii

Silver-backed Tanager Tangara viridicollis Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge. Here the nominate subspecies

Green Honeycreeper Chlorophanes spiza Seen at Villa Jennifer

Purple Honeycreeper Cyanerpes caeruleus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Cinereous Conebill Conirostrum cinereum Seen at Lomas de Lachay and in the Santa Eulalia Valley

Capped Conebill Conirostrum albifrons Seen at mid-elevations in the cloudforest of Satipo. Here the subspecies sordidum

Giant Conebill Oreomanes fraseri Distant views of one bird at La Quinua, the Polylepis forest patch near Huánuco. The species is classified as Near-threatened.

Rusty Flowerpiercer Diglossa sittoides Seen below San Pedro de Casta in the Santa Eulalia Valley

Moustached Flowerpiercer Diglossa mystacalis Seen at Bosque Unchog. Here the subspecies pectoralis

Bluish Flowerpiercer Diglossa caerulescens Seen at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Masked Flowerpiercer Diglossa cyanea Seen at Bosque Unchog, Ulcumano Ecolodge, and the Satipo Road

White-winged Diuca Finch Diuca speculifera Nice views in the Marcapomacocha area

Great Inca Finch (E) Incaspiza pulchra Great views of one pair near Puente Autisha in the Santa Eulalia Valley. A country endemic. The whole Incaspiza genus is endemic to Peru.

Rufous-backed Inca Finch (E) Incaspiza personata Excellent sightings near Huánuco. A country endemic

Collared Warbling Finch Poospiza hispaniolensis Good views of one male at Lomas de Lachay

Bright-rumped Yellow Finch Sicalis uropigyalis Seen at Marcapomacocha

Saffron Finch Sicalis flaveola Seen around Lima gardens

Greenish Yellow Finch Sicalis olivascens Flying-by views of a flock near Puente Autisha in the Santa Eulalia Valley

Raimondi’s Yellow Finch (E) Sicalis raimondii A large flock was flying above the Lomas de Lachay fields. Not an easy bird to find. Named after Antonio Raimondi, 19th-century Italian explorer, scholar, and naturalist. Although still listed as a country endemic, it was recently found in Northern Chile.

Grassland Yellow Finch Sicalis luteola Seen in the reed vegetation around the lakes at Pantanos de Villa

Blue-black Grassquit Volatinia jacarina Seen in the fields south of Lima

Golden-billed Saltator Saltator aurantiirostris Seen along the Pariahuanca Road

Buff-throated Saltator Saltator maximus Seen at Villa Jennifer

Mourning Sierra Finch Phrygilus fruticeti Seen in the upper parts of the Santa Eulalia Road

Ash-breasted Sierra Finch Phrygilus plebejus Seen well along the Santa Eulalia Valley and a couple in the Marcapomacocha area

Plumbeous Sierra Finch Phrygilus unicolor Nice views at Marcapomacocha

Band-tailed Sierra Finch Phrygilus alaudinus Seen at Lomas de Lachay National Reserve

Peruvian Sierra Finch Phrygilus punensis Seen at higher elevations in Marcapomacocha and at Lake Junín. A near-endemic found in Peru and Bolivia

Yellow-bellied Seedeater Sporophila nigricollis One male was seen in the garden of our hotel in La Merced.

Drab Seedeater Sporophila simplex Seen along the Santa Eulalia Road at 1000 meters. A near-endemic, found in Ecuador and Peru only

Chestnut-throated Seedeater Sporophila telasco Seen in the fields south of Lima

Chestnut-bellied Seed Finch Oryzoborus angolensis Seen at Villa Jennifer

Band-tailed Seedeater Catamenia analis Seen below San Pedro de Casta at Santa Eulalia

Plain-colored Seedeater Catamenia inornata Seen at Bosque Unchog

Cardinalidae

Tooth-billed Tanager Piranga lutea Seen on the Satipo Road

Golden Grosbeak Pheucticus chrysogaster Seen above Santa Eulalia at 950 meters

CENTRAL PERU MAMMAL LIST, NOVEMBER 2016

Southern mountain vizcacha Lagidium viscacia This handsome-looking rodent was seen on the rocky slopes of Marcapomacocha at 4600 meters.

Peruvian bamboo bat (H) Dactylomys peruanus Heard at Ulcumano Ecolodge

Vicuña Vicugna vicugna These splendid creatures were seen well across the Junín plains. They are found only at high elevations above 4000 meters in the Andes.

Andean fox Lycalopex culpaeus Seen below San Pedro de Casta

Marine otter Lontra felina Brief views of one individual around Pucusana Bay. The species is classified as endangered.

South American sea lion Otaria byronia Several seen on Pucusana Island

Black-headed squirrel monkey Saimiri boliviensis